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“The System,” as Uncovered by the San Francisco Graft Prosecution

""The System," As Uncovered by the San Francisco Graft Prosecution" by Franklin Hichborn. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

A Bit of Old China

"A Bit of Old China" by Charles Warren Stoddard. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

A California Girl

This book is not written for the specialist, but for that restless, seething multitude known as "the masses." It is written for busy people, for workers, such as the shop-girl, the factory-girl, the clerk, the mechanic, the farmer, the merchant, and the busy housewife; but ministers, lawyers, and doctors may find food for thought within its covers.My heart goes out to God's secular army, composed of those who have neither time nor opportunity to go through learned treatises and scholarly essays, yet whose natures are hungering for something better than they see and hear about them. So I have tried to weave into this story the best and latest thought that has been given to the world, believing it to be what the workers most need in the performance of their daily duties, and what will help them out of bondage.People whose reading and observation have been limited may think that I have drawn on my imagination altogether for most of the material in this book. I can assure them that such is not the case; much of it is real.In regard to Penloe, there have been men who had greater spiritual gifts than he, and I call to mind one, still living, whose illuminated countenance and remarkable personality are superior to his. In Penloe is seen the interior life of the Hindu combined with the best practical thought of the West.Let a youth or maiden commence to live the life described by the man who won the heart of the "Oriental Lady," related by Penloe in his "Original Address," and he or she will then realize the facts which have made the characters of Penloe and Stella.To any sensitive, fastidious reader I would say, it becomes an author, in order to be true to life, to present certain characters as they really are, and put into their mouths the language they actually use. Whatever there is of error in the book is the result of egoism; whatever of truth and love is the work of Him who has brought me up out of the marshes and lowlands, and caused me to drink at the crystal fountains of the hills.

A Drift From Redwood Camp

Western short story. According to Wikipedia: "Bret Harte (August 25, 1836[2] ? May 6, 1902) was an American author and poet, best remembered for his accounts of pioneering life in California. He was born in Albany, New York. ... He moved to California in 1853, later working there in a number of capacities, including miner, teacher, messenger, and journalist. He spent part of his life in the northern California coast town now known as Arcata, then just a mining camp on Humboldt Bay. His first literary efforts, including poetry and prose, appeared in The Californian, an early literary journal edited by Charles Henry Webb. In 1868 he became editor of The Overland Monthly, another new literary magazine, but this one more in tune with the pioneering spirit of excitement in California. His story, "The Luck of Roaring Camp," appeared in the magazine's second edition, propelling Harte to nationwide fame... Determined to pursue his literary career, in 1871 he and his family traveled back East, to New York and eventually to Boston, where he contracted with the publisher of The Atlantic Monthly for an annual salary of $10,000, "an unprecedented sum at the time." His popularity waned, however, and by the end of 1872 he was without a publishing contract and increasingly desperate. He spent the next few years struggling to publish new work (or republish old), delivering lectures about the gold rush, and even selling an advertising jingle to a soap company. In 1878 Harte was appointed to the position of United States Consul in the town of Krefeld, Germany and then to Glasgow in 1880. In 1885 he settled in London. During the thirty years he spent in Europe, he never abandoned writing, and maintained a prodigious output of stories that retained the freshness of his earlier work. He died in England in 1902 of throat cancer and is buried at Frimley."

A Millionaire of Rough-And-Ready; A Phyllis of the Sierras; A Drift From Redwood Camp (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from A Millionaire of Rough-and-Ready; A Phyllis of the Sierras; A Drift From Redwood Camp It had lain there before him a moment ago - a mis shapen piece of brown-stained quartz, interspersed with dull yellow metal; yielding enough to have allowed the points of his pick to penetrate its honeycombed recesses; yet heavy enough to drop from the point of his pick as he endeavoured to lift it from the red earth. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

A Sappho of Green Springs and Other Stories

A Sappho of Green Springs and other stories is an unchanged, high-quality reprint of the original edition of 1891. Hansebooks is editor of the literature on different topic areas such as research and science, travel and expeditions, cooking and nutrition, medicine, and other genres. As a publisher we focus on the preservation of historical literature. Many works of historical writers and scientists are available today as antiques only. Hansebooks newly publishes these books and contributes to the preservation of literature which has become rare and historical knowledge for the future.

A Summer in a Canyon: A California Story

"A Summer in a Canyon" by Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

A Vendetta of the Hills

“A Vendetta of the Hills” by Willis George Emerson. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of

Argonauts of North Liberty

A fascinating tale in Harte's signature style. First published in 1888, it keeps the reader engrossed with its fast-paced narrative and surprising twists and turns in the plot. Captivating!

Audubon’s Western Journal: 1849-1850

Being the MS. Record of a Trip from New York to Texas, and an Overland Journey through Mexico and Arizona to the Gold-Fields of California. With map, portrait, and original drawings. First published in 1906, with a biographical memoir by Maria R. Audubon, the author's daughter, and an introduction by Frank Hodder Heywood, Professor of American History at the University of Kansas. John Woodhouse Audubon (1812-62), a respected naturalist, writer and painter in his own right, was the son of John James Audubon (1785-1851), the American ornithologist, naturalist and painter, notable for his extensive studies of all types of American birds and for his detailed illustrations depicting the birds in their natural habitats.

Black Man in the White House

Black Man in the White House, first published in 1963, is the White House account of E. Frederic Morrow (1906-1994), the first African-American to serve on a Presidential staff in an executive position. During the 1950s, Morrow was a member of President Eisenhower?s inner circle of policy-makers, and the book, extracted from Morrow?s diaries, is a fascinating look at the Eisenhower administration and also of a country coming-to-grips with the about-to-explode problems of segregation and racial inequality.E. Frederic Morrow is the first African-American in history to have served on a Presidential staff in an executive capacity. During the Eisenhower years he was in the White House as a member of President Eisenhower?s inner circle of policy makers. Because of the historical element in this unprecedented situation, Mr. Morrow kept a number of diaries. The book that emerges from them is fascinating, poignant, and sometimes shocking. You get to meet everyone from Richard Nixon to Sherman Adams to Nkrumah Kwame from a unique perspective. His concern for the direction of the Republican party is prescient and palpable. I could not put it down.

Blix

A romantic comedy set in turn-of-the-century California, by the author of "The Octopus" and "The Pit."

California Athabascan Groups

"[...]years there would be a hard winter, but she could remember only one when people actually starved to death. In February or March the spring salmon run began, and after that the danger of starvation was past. At about this time the grass began to grow again, and the first clover was eaten ravenously because of the dearth of greens during the winter. The herb-gathering and salmon-fishing activity lasted until the spring rains ended in April or May, when the people left their villages on the salmon streams and scattered out into the hills for the summer. Usually only a few families would stay together during the summer, while the men hunted deer, squirrels, and other animals and the women gathered clover, seeds, roots, and nuts. Food was most plentiful at this season, and the places visited varied with[...]".