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The Constable De Bourbon: Novel

William Harrison Ainsworth (4 February 1805 - 3 January 1882) was an English historical novelist born at King Street in Manchester. He trained as a lawyer, but the legal profession held no attraction for him. While completing his legal studies in London he met the publisher John Ebers, at that time manager of the King's Theatre, Haymarket. Ebers introduced Ainsworth to literary and dramatic circles, and to his daughter, who became Ainsworth's wife.Ainsworth briefly tried the publishing business, but soon gave it up and devoted himself to journalism and literature. His first success as a writer came with Rookwood in 1834, which features Dick Turpin as its leading character. A stream of 39 novels followed, the last of which appeared in 1881. Ainsworth died in Reigate on 3 January 1882.Early lifeAinsworth was born on 4 February 1805 in the family house at 21 King Street, Manchester, to Thomas Ainsworth, a prominent Manchester lawyer, and Ann (Harrison) Ainsworth, the daughter of the Rev. Ralph Harrison, the Unitarian minister at Manchester Cross Street Chapel. On 4 October 1806, Ainsworth's brother, Thomas Gilbert Ainsworth, was born. Although the family home was eventually destroyed, it was a three-storey Georgian home in a well-to-do community. The area influenced Ainsworth with its historical and romantic atmosphere, which existed until the community was later replaced by commercial buildings. Besides the community, Ainsworth read romantic works as a child and enjoyed stories dealing with either adventure or supernatural themes. Of these, Dick Turpin was a favourite of Ainsworth. During his childhood, he adopted Jacobean ideas and held Tory ideas in addition to his Jacobite sympathies, even though his community was strict Whig and Nonconformist. During this time, Ainsworth began to write prolifically.The Ainsworth family moved to Smedly Lane, north of Manchester in Cheetham Hill, during 1811. They kept the old residence in addition to the new, but resided in the new home most of the time. The surrounding hilly country was covered in woods, which allowed Ainsworth and his brother to act out various stories. When not playing, Ainsworth was tutored by his uncle, William Harrison. In March 1817, he was enrolled at Manchester Grammar School, which was described in his novel Mervyn Clitheroe. The work emphasised that his classical education was of good quality but was reinforced with strict discipline and corporal punishment. Ainsworth was a strong student and was popular among his fellow students. His school days were mixed; his time within the school and with his family was calm even though there were struggles within the Manchester community, the Peterloo Massacre taking place in 1819. Ainsworth was connected to the event because his uncles joined in protest at the incident, but Ainsworth was able to avoid most of the political after-effects. During the time, he was able to pursue his own literary interests and even created his own little theatre within the family home at King Street. Along with his friends and brother, he created and acted in many plays throughout 1820.During 1820, Ainsworth began to publish many of his works under the name "Thomas Hall." The first work, a play called The Rivals, was published on 5 March 1821 in Arliss's Pocket Magazine. Throughout 1821, the magazine printed seventeen other works of Ainsworth's under the names "Thomas Hall," "H A" or "W A." The genre and forms of the work greatly varied, with one being a claim to have found plays of a 17th-century playwright "William Aynesworthe," which ended up being his own works. This trick was later exposed. In December 1821, Ainsworth submitted his play Venice, or the Fall of the Foscaris to The Edinburgh Magazine.

The Poems in Prose

This volume contains all of Baudelaire's Petits Po?mes en prose', which were written over many years and published in magazines between 1855 and his death in 1867. The French is given on the left-hand page with Francis Scarfe's translations, which reflect a lifetime's passion for and intimate understanding of Baudelaire's work, on the facing page. The appeal of this beautiful book', says Francis Scarfe in his introduction, 'lies in its wide range of subjects, its variations of tone and mood, its great variety of presentation and above all in its psychological subtleties. It shows the poet at the height of his powers, totally uninhibited in his expression of wonder, tenderness and compassion'. To these prose poems Francis Scarfe has appended an early prose extravaganza, the short novel La Fanfarlo' (1847).The companion volume, The Complete Verse', contains Les Fleurs du mal' (1861), Nouvelles Fleurs du mal' (1868), Les ?paves' (1866) and all of Baudelaire's other poetry in verse.Francis Scarfe (1911-86) was a lecturer in French poetry at Glasgow University before and again after World War II. From 1959 to 1978, he was director of the British Institute. In recognition of his contribution to Anglo-French cultural relations he was made a Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres (1962), and for his work on Baudelaire he was awarded the Prix de L'Ile Saint-Louis (1966); on his retirement in 1978 he was made a Chevalier de la L?gion d'Honneur. He was the author of four collections of poetry and of the critical works Auden and After' and Andr? Ch?nier, His Life and Work'.

The Problem of ‘Edwin Drood’: A Study in the Methods of Dickens

"The Problem of 'Edwin Drood': A Study in the Methods of Dickens" by Sir W. Robertson Nicoll. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

The Puzzle of Dickens’s Last Plot (Webster’s Chinese Traditional Thesaurus Edition)

Websters paperbacks take advantage of the fact that classics are frequently assigned readings in English courses. By using a running English-to-Chinese Traditional thesaurus at the bottom of each page, this edition of The Puzzle of Dickenss Last Plot by Andrew Lang was edited for three audiences. The first includes Chinese Traditional-speaking students enrolled in an English Language Program (ELP), an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) program, an English as a Second Language Program (ESL), or in a TOEFL or TOEIC preparation program. The second audience includes English-speaking students enrolled in bilingual education programs or Chinese Traditional speakers enrolled in English-speaking schools. The third audience consists of students who are actively building their vocabularies in Chinese Traditional in order to take foreign service, translation certification, Advanced Placement (AP) or similar examinations. By using the Webster's Chinese Traditional Thesaurus Edition when assigned for an English course, the reader can enrich their vocabulary in anticipation of an examination in Chinese Traditional or English. TOEFL, TOEIC, AP and Advanced Placement are trademarks of the Educational Testing Service which has neither reviewed nor endorsed this book. All rights reserved. Websters edition of this classic is organized to expose the reader to a maximum number of difficult and potentially ambiguous English words. Rare or idiosyncratic words and expressions are given lower priority compared to difficult, yet commonly used words. Rather than supply a single translation, many words are translated for a variety of meanings in Chinese Traditional, allowing readers to better grasp the ambiguityof English, and avoid them using the notes as a pure translation crutch. Having the reader decipher a words meaning within context serves to improve vocabulary retention a

Two Expeditions Into the Interior of Southern Australia – Complete

“Two Expeditions into the Interior of Southern Australia ? Complete” by Charles Sturt. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes