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1492

It was one of the most exciting periods in history. The impact of Gutenberg books was starting to be felt. Martin Luther was soon to touch-off the Reformation; and a wild-eyed adventurer by the name of Christopher Columbus was about to make obsolete every world map of his day. This is the story of Columbus, but it is not told through the eyes of an academic or an historian. It is told by a simple sailor-a Christian of secret Jewish ancestry-whose hopes and fears not only makes the story more engaging, but all the more realistic. From the fear and confusion of the first voyage, to the clash of the European and native American cultures, to Columbus' final vindication, Mary Johnston's talent for combining adventure and historical detail is at its finest. Everyone knows the story of Christopher Columbus, now read it from a whole new-and enormously refreshing-perspective. "We have come to expect first-rate writing from Mary Johnston; but what surprises is the sheer emotional power of the book."

Among the Esquimaux; Or, Adventures Under the Arctic Circle (1894 )

Edward Sylvester Ellis (April 11, 1840 - June 20, 1916) was an American author who was born in Ohio and died at Cliff Island, Maine.Ellis was a teacher, school administrator, journalist, and the author of hundreds of books and magazine articles that he produced by his name and by a number of noms de plume. Notable fiction stories by Ellis include The Steam Man of the Prairies and Seth Jones, or the Captives of the Frontier.Internationally, Edward S. Ellis is probably known best for his Deerfoot novels read widely by young boys until the 1950s.Dime novelsSeth Jones was the most significant of early dime novels of publishers Beadle and Adams. It is said that Seth Jones was one of Abraham Lincoln's favorite stories. During the mid-1880s, after a fiction-writing career of some thirty years, Ellis eventually began composing more serious works of biography, history, and persuasive writing. Of note was "The Life of Colonel David Crockett," which had the story of Davy Crockett giving a speech usually called "Not Yours To Give." It was a speech in opposition to awarding money to a Navy widow on the grounds that Congress had no Constitutional mandate to give charity. It was said to have been inspired by Crockett's meeting with a Horatio Bunce, a much quoted man in Libertarian circles, but one for whom historical evidence is non-existent.PseudonymsBesides the one hundred fifty-nine books published by his own name, Ellis' work was published under various pseudonyms, including: "James Fenimore Cooper Adams" or "Captain Bruin Adams" (68 titles)"Boynton M. Belknap" (9 titles)"J. G. Bethune" (1 title)"Captain Latham C. Carleton" (2 titles)"Frank Faulkner" (1 title)"Capt. R. M. Hawthorne" (4 titles)"Lieut. Ned Hunter" (5 titles)"Lieut. R. H. Jayne" (at least 2 titles in the War Whoop series)[8]"Charles E. Lasalle" (16 titles)"H. R. Millbank" (3 titles)"Billex Muller" (3 titles)"Lieut. J. H. Randolph" (8 titles)"Emerson Rodman" (10 titles)"E. A. St. Mox" (2 titles)"Seelin Robins" (19 titles)He was a major author during the era of inexpensive fiction of the nineteenth century (dime novels). Because he wrote under dozens of pseudonyms, as well as under his own name, it is virtually impossible to know exactly how many books he wrote, but it is believed to be in the hundreds. Notable works include: The Lost Trail (1884), The Land of Mystery (1889), Through Forest and Fire (1891), Two Boys in Wyoming (1898), Thomas Jefferson (1898/1903), The Jungle Fugitives (1903) and Oonomoo: The Huron (1911).

Drake’s Great Armada

"[...] NARRATIVE MAINLY BY CAPTAIN WALTER BIGGS A Summary and True Discourse of Sir Francis Drake's West Indian Voyage, begun in the year 1585. Wherein were taken the cities of Santiago, Santo Domingo, Carthagena, and the town of St. Augustine, in Florida. Published by Master Thomas Cates. This worthy knight, for the service of his prince and country, having prepared his whole fleet, and gotten them down to Plymouth, in Devonshire, to the number of five and twenty sail of ships and pinnaces, and having assembled of soldiers and mariners to the number of 2,300 in the whole, embarked them and himself at Plymouth aforesaid, the 12th day of September, 1585, being accompanied with these men of name and charge which hereafter follow: Master Christopher Carlile, Lieutenant-General, a man of long experience in the wars as well by sea as land, who had formerly carried high offices in both kinds in many[...]".

Hot Planet

A team of scientists are sent to Mercury aboard the Albireo to find out why it's developing an atmosphere. A series of events force the scientists out of their ship and onto the surface of Mercury, where only their courage and intelligence can keep them alive. Clement paints a tense and completely believable image of Mercury. He was simply one of the best hard science fiction writers the field ever produced.

In the Wonderful Land of Hez; Or, the Mystery of the Fountain of Youth

"In the Wonderful Land of Hez; or, The Mystery of the Fountain of Youth" by Cornelius Shea. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Laperouse

"Laperouse" by Sir Ernest Scott. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Perfect Answer

Getting there may be half the fun ... but it is also all of a society's chance of survival!

Some Heroes of Travel Or, Chapters From the History of Geographical Discovery and Enterprise

"Some Heroes of Travel or, Chapters from the History of Geographical Discovery and Enterprise" by W. H. Davenport Adams. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Spinster of This Parish

In 1920, young Mildred Parker is asking advice from the "spinster" Emmeline Verinder. Mildred is in love with a man of whom her parents do not approve. Emmeline recalls her own youth. In 1885. Emmeline was part of the Victorian social whirl, when she met the famous explorer, Anthony Dyke, and was swept away. Dyke revealed that he was tricked into marrying a madwoman, who is now in an asylum. Emmeline decided their love was more important than society's opinion, moved away to become his mistress. But an explorer must go exploring, and soon Dyke was setting off for South America. After an emotional goodbye, he sailed but soon found Emmeline had snuck aboard the ship. Adventures in South America involved emerald mines, duels, and deep caves, but their love remained. Finally back in England, Emmeline began to re-enter English society. Dyke continued his adventures, setting off, at last, for the South Pole.

The Australian Explorers; Their Labours, Perils, and Achievements

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ...for many years past. It was first discovered by Hamilton Hume in connection with Sturt's expedition to the Macquarie, and was then called New Year's Creek. Much later its upper course had been traced by a Mr. Dixon for 67 miles, and the exploration of its whole length was thus completed by Major Mitchell in 1835. The Bogan was found to head from the Hervey Range, and this explorer had the good fortune to discover its termination in the Darling River after a sinuous course of 250 miles. At best it is only a third or fourth-class river; but, as it traverses a tolerably good grazing country, its basin has become fully occupied for squatting purposes. The junction of these two rivers now became an important landmark for the remainder of the journey, and the place has ever since played a conspicuous part in the opening up and settlement of the back country. The position consists of an elevated plateau overlooking a reach of the river a mile and a half in. length, with a hill situated near a sharp turn at the lower end of the reach. Having nowgtravelled 500 miles from Sydney, the whole party were in need of rest, and Mitchell wisely resolved on fixing a permanent depot here. Intending to leave some of his men while engaged in the exploration of the lower course of the river, he considered it an act of prudence to enclose the depot with a stockade, as he was not yet sufficiently acquainted with the natives of the Darling to trust them with any degree of confidence. A stockade was accordingly constructed of rough logs, and to this, his first attempt at bush fortification, he gave the name of Fort Bourke, in compliment to the Governor of the colony. Such was the beginning of Bourke, the now famous centre of our back country settlement,... **