Showing 31–60 of 197 results

Bertha, Our Little German Cousin

"Bertha, Our Little German Cousin" by Mary Hazelton Blanchard Wade. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Blood and Iron; Origin of German Empire as Revealed by Character of Its Founder, Bismarck

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Britain’s Deadly Peril: Are We Told the Truth?

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

Captain Lucy and Lieutenant Bob (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from Captain Lucy and Lieutenant Bob The war is as yet only beginning for Lucy Gor don, and the old, pleasant times are just ending, but, like every other girl in America, she is trying hard to find the courage and cheerfulness which have never yet been wanting in our Service and which are going to help America to win. In Captain Lucy in France she sees the peril ous Front for herself, and has a small part in some great events. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Chronicles of the Schonberg-Cotta Family

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Covered With Mud and Glory: A Machine Gun Company in Action (“Ma Mitrailleuse”)

The author of this book, SERGEANT-MAJOR GEORGES LAFOND, of the Territorial Hussars, was in South America at the time of mobilization. He returned to France as soon as possible and joined his corps, but asked to be assigned as intelligence officer to the machine-gun sections of the first regiment of Colonial Infantry.With this picked corps, which has been decimated several times, he took part in the engagements in Champagne, on the Somme, at Lihons, Dompierre, Herb?court, and notably in the days from the first to the fifth of July, where the regiment earned its second citation and received the fourrag?re.Lafond was discharged after the battles of Maisonnette, and wrote this book of recollections in the hospital at Abbeville, and afterwards at Montpellier, where he had to undergo a severe operation. Sergeant-Major Lafond?s narrative makes no claim to literary pretension, but it is simply a collection of actual occurrences. It is a series of short narratives which give the life of a company of machine gunners from the day of its formation to the hour when it was so decimated that it had to be reorganized with men from other corps.

Deutschland ?ber Allah

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Diary of a Pilgrimage

Jerome Klapka Jerome (1859 ?1927) was an English writer and humourist. The pilgrimage of the title is a journey to see the famous Passion Play at Oberammergau, which has been performed every ten years since 1634, the middle of the Thirty Years War. ?Diary? is a typically witty account of this journey, part travelogue and part social commentary. Journalist, playwright and author, a wealth of his writing has remained just beyond the public gaze. ?Diary of a Pilgrimage? is one such work.

Disputation of Doctor Martin Luther on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences

First published in 1517, 'Disputation of Doctor Martin Luther on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences' is a list of propositions for an academic disputation written by Martin Luther, who started the Protestant Reformation, a schism in the Catholic Church which profoundly changed Europe.

Dividing Waters (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from Dividing Waters The girl had her place at the table. Though She sat perfectly still, never turning her eyes from her father's face, there was something in her rigid attitude which sug gested irritation and impatience. Her hands lay in her lap; only a close Observer would have seen that they were not folded, but clenched, so that the knuckles stood out white. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Ein Sendbrief Vom Dolmetschen – an Open Letter on Translating

Martin Luther wrote the Open Letter on Translation in September 1530 at the fortress of Coburg in Saxony where he was being kept for his own protection. It was a crucial moment in the Reformation: his colleagues were at the Imperial Diet at Augsburg, making a formal proclamation of Protestantism before the Emperor. Luther used the Open Letter to defend his translation of the Bible, and the work has become a seminal document in German literature, translation studies, and Reformation theology.Luther's German translation unlocked the Bible for the millions of his contemporaries who did not understand Latin. It was not the first German version of the Bible, or even the first in print, but it was the first to reach a mass audience. Given Luther's belief in 'sola scriptura', that is, scripture as the sole medium for the word of God, the translation of the Bible was an enactment of his own theology. A vernacular Bible in the hands of the laity was also a powerful weapon to challenge Church practices which had no scriptural basis. It was not just the fact that Luther translated the Bible that was important: it was also the way he did it. Like others before him, Luther cultivated a sense-for-sense, as opposed to a word-for-word, approach. His great innovation was a translation style close in register to colloquial speech, but with a simple eloquence that brought the original text alive. The language of Luther's Bible was so influential that even his opponents, Catholic and Protestant alike, used it as the basis for their own rival versions. Luther's German Bible was to serve for centuries as a model of grammar and style, and to play a foundational part in the development of the standard language.In the Open Letter on Translation Luther offers general advice on translation as well as a defence of some of the specific translation choices he made in his German New Testament. From these it becomes clear what his guiding principles were as a translator: an intimate knowledge of the source and target language, a feel for the idiom of both, and an understanding of the author's purpose. The same questions preoccupy translators today, whether they are working with sacred texts or not. The Open Letter affords us a glimpse into the translation technique of one its most successful exponents. The Open Letter also gives us a taste of Luther's style and method of argument. His syntax and vocabulary are plain and direct, his tone sometimes academic but more often informal, and the text is interspersed with colourful turns of phrase. His arguments are, in keeping with academic discourse at the time, a combination of appeals to reason or authority, ridicule, and invective. In the Open Letter we have Luther, at one point, analysing the Hebrew, Greek, and Latin precedents to argue against the translation, 'Mary, full of grace', and, at another, summarizing his attitude to Dr Snotty-Nose and his other detractors as follows: 'The fact is, a donkey doesn't need to do much braying: you just have to look at his ears'.This new edition of the Open Letter introduces the work for the modern reader, and the translation aims to bring Martin Luther's irreverent and brilliant rhetoric to life, as the great practitioner explains his methods and principles.

Elizabeth and Her German Garden

May 16th.-The garden is the place I go to for refuge and shelter, not the house. In the house are duties and annoyances, servants to exhort and admonish, furniture, and meals; but out there blessings crowd round me at every step-it is there that I am sorry for the unkindness in me, for those selfish thoughts that are so much worse than they feel; it is there that all my sins and silliness are forgiven, there that I feel protected and at home, and every flower and weed is a friend and every tree a lover. -from Elizabeth and Her German Garden First published anonymously in 1898, this beautiful chronicle of languid days spent in a rejuvenating Italian garden was a tremendous bestseller at the turn of the century, its cheerful satire and fresh charm endearing it to millions of readers. The first work of its author, the Countess Elizabeth von Arnim, it would form the basis of her extraordinary popularity as one of the most admired literary figures in Europe and "one of the three finest wits of her day." British novelist ELIZABETH VON ARNIM (1866-1941) wrote numerous books, including The Solitary Summer (the sequel to Elizabeth and Her German Garden) and the work she is best known for, Enchanted April.