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A Dear Little Girl at School

A Dear Little Girl at Schoolby Amy Ella BlanchardA wholesome child's story, one of the sort that commends itself to children's sympathies and will be conned again and again. No mother need hesitate ever putting this or any other of Miss Blanchard's stories into her little daughter's hands.

A Dear Little Girl: Large Print

This is a pretty, wholesome child's story, one of the sort that commends itself to children's sympathies and will be conned again and again. No mother need hesitate ever putting this or any other of Miss Blanchard's stories into her little daughter's hands.

A Dear Little Girl’s Summer Holidays

Extract: Mrs. Conway smiled. 'I think I can venture to say that much or even a little more. I can say that I should like very much to have you go.' 'Goody! Goody!' cried Edna clapping her hands. 'That is almost as if you said I really could. I had a letter from Jennie, Mother, and she is just crazy for us to come. You know Dorothy is invited, too. Would you like to see Jennie's letter?' 'Very much.' Edna promptly handed over the blue envelope, and was not disappointed to have her mother say, 'That is a very nice cordial letter, Edna, and I am sure the invitation shows that both Mrs. Ramsey and Jennie really want you. I will talk it over with your father this evening. Now run along, and don't exercise too vigorously this warm day, and don't forget what I said about being in the sun.' She returned to her letters and Edna with Dorothy left the room. 'Now we must go to my mother, ' declared Dorothy

A Dear Little Girl’s Thanksgiving Holidays

A delightful tale of love and tenderness during the Thanksgiving holidays, filled with charming detail, dialog and written with passion, joy and enthusiasm. In this fourth and final installment from the author's Dear Little Girl series, young readers will be will inspired to celebrate with equal good-will, love and amusement. In this episode, Edna Conway spends a most delightful Thanksgiving at her grandmother's.

A Little Princess: Being the Whole Story of Sara Crewe Now Told for the First Time

It seemed to her many years since he had begun to prepare her mind for ?the place,? as she always called it. Her mother had died when she was born, so she had never known or missed her. Her young, handsome, rich, petting father seemed to be the only relation she had in the world. They had always played together and been fond of each other. She only knew he was rich because she had heard people say so when they thought she was not listening, and she had also heard them say that when she grew up she would be rich, too. She did not know all that being rich meant. She had always lived in a beautiful bungalow, and had been used to seeing many servants who made salaams to her and called her ?Missee Sahib,? and gave her her own way in everything. She had had toys and pets and an ayah who worshipped her, and she had gradually learned that people who were rich had these things. That, however, was all she knew about it. During her short life only one thing had troubled her, and that thing was ?the place? she was to be taken to some day. The climate of India was very bad for children, and as soon as possible they were sent away from it?generally to England and to school. She had seen other children go away, and had heard their fathers and mothers talk about the letters they received from them. She had known that she would be obliged to go also, and though sometimes her father?s stories of the voyage and the new country had attracted her, she had been troubled by the thought that he could not stay with her. ?Couldn?t you go to that place with me, papa?? she had asked when she was five years old. ?Couldn?t you go to school, too? I would help you with your lessons.? ?But you will not have to stay for a very long time, little Sara,? he had always said. ?You will go to a nice house where there will be a lot of little girls, and you will play together, and I will send you plenty of books, and you will grow so fast that it will seem scarcely a year before you are big enough and clever enough to come back and take care of papa.? She had liked to think of that. To keep the house for her father; to ride with him, and sit at the head of his table when he had dinner-parties; to talk to him and read his books?that would be what she would like most in the world, and if one must go away to ?the place? in England to attain it, she must make up her mind to go. She did not care very much for other little girls, but if she had plenty of books she could console herself. She liked books more than anything else, and was, in fact, always inventing stories of beautiful things and telling them to herself. Sometimes she had told them to her father, and he had liked them as much as she did.

A New England Girlhood Outlined From Memory (Beverly Ma)

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

Alice’s Blighted Profession: A Sketch for Girls

"Alice's Blighted Profession: A Sketch for Girls" by Helen C. Clifford. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

An American Girl in London

"An American Girl in London" by Sara Jeannette Duncan. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Anne of Green Gables

Get your "A" in gear!They're today's most popular study guides-with everything you need to succeed in school. Written by Harvard students for students, since its inception SparkNotes? has developed a loyal community of dedicated users and become a major education brand. Consumer demand has been so strong that the guides have expanded to over 150 titles. SparkNotes'? motto is Smarter, Better, Faster because:? They feature the most current ideas and themes, written by experts.? They're easier to understand, because the same people who use them have also written them.? The clear writing style and edited content enables students to read through the material quickly, saving valuable time.And with everything covered,context; plot overview; character lists; themes, motifs, and symbols; summary and analysis, key facts; study questions and essay topics; and reviews and resources,you don't have to go anywhere else!

Anxious Audrey

Mabel Quiller-Couch (1866-1924) was a Cornish writer. She was the the sister of Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch, and her sister Lilian M. Quiller- Couch was an author as well. She wrote Ancient and Holy Wells of Cornwall with her sister in 1894. Other works include Martha's Trial (1895), One Good Seed Sown (1896), The Recovery of Jane Vercoe.. (1896), Some Western Folk (1897), Paul the Courageous (1901), A Waif and a Welcome (1905), Zach and Derby (1906), The Carroll Girls (1906), A Pair of Red Dolls (1907), Troublesome Ursula (1907), Kitty Trenire (1909), Some Great Little People (1910), The Story of Jessie (1910), Children of Olden Days (1910), On Windycross Moor (1910), The Mean-Wells (1910), True Tales from History (1910), The Little Princess.. (1910), Better than Play (1911), A Book of Children's Verse (as editor) (1911) and Dick and Brownie (1912).

Aunt Jimmy’s Will

Aunt Jimmy's WillJoshua?s honest face flushed with pleasure at the implied trust, yet he could hardly keep the smile from his lips and a mysterious twinkle from his eyes as he shook the doctor?s hand heartily and answered: ?We?re much obleeged, and we?ll never forget that you and Mis?is Jedd held us well enough in esteem to make the offer, but I reckon the only way we could come to own the fruit farm would be by buying it out fair and square. I don?t say but I?d be downhearted to see it go by me, especially to ?Biram Slocum, for they?ve been days, doc, when I?ve even kind o? pictured out the two farms, ourn and it, joined fast by your sellin?[216]?me that wood bluff that runs in between from the highway. But you know the sayin?, doc, ?Man proposes, woman disposes,? and all that.??This time the doctor caught the wink that Joshua?s near eye gave in spite of itself, but thought that it referred to Aunt Jimmy?s peculiarities.??Well,? said the doctor, deliberately, a genial smile spreading over his features, ?one thing I?ll do to help out your picturing, as you call it. If luck should turn so that you buy the fruit farm, I?ll sell you the wood knoll for what I gave for it, and that?s the first time I ever considered parting with it, though I?ve had no end of good offers.???Here?s the boys jest come home in time to witness that there remark o? yourn. Ain?t yer gettin? kind er rash ?n? hasty, doc????No, Joshua, the more witnesses, the better,? and the two men went out the door, toward the fence where the doctor?s chaise was tied, laughing heartily.? As to the boys, they were completely bewildered, for not a word did they know, or would until after the auction, and they had not the remotest idea that their father even dreamed of bidding on the fruit farm.