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A Victor of Salamis: History

CHAPTER II THE ATHLETE There was ceaseless coming and going outside the Precinct of Poseidon. Following much the same path

Active Service

MARJORY walked pensively along the hall. In the cool shadows made by the palms on the window ledge, her face wore the expression of thoughtful melancholy expected on the faces of the devotees who pace in cloistered gloom. She halted before a door at the end of the hall and laid her hand on the knob. She stood hesitating, her head bowed. It was evident that this mission was to require great fortitude. At last she opened the door. "Father," she began at once. There was disclosed an elderly, narrow-faced man seated at a large table and surrounded by manu-scripts and books. The sunlight flowing through curtains of Turkey red fell sanguinely upon the bust of dead-eyed Pericles on the mantle. A little clock was ticking, hidden somewhere among the countless leaves of writing, the maps and broad heavy tomes that swarmed upon the table.

Alexander the Great: Makers of History

The history of the life of every individual who has, for any reason, attracted extensively the attention of mankind, has been written in a great variety of ways by a multitude of authors, and persons sometimes wonder why we should have so many different accounts of the same thing. The reason is, that each one of these accounts is intended for a different set of readers, who read with ideas and purposes widely dissimilar from each other. Among the twenty millions of people in the United States, there are perhaps two millions, between the ages of fifteen and twenty-five, who wish to become acquainted, in general, with the leading events in the history of the Old World, and of ancient times, but who, coming upon the stage in this land and at this period, have ideas and conceptions so widely different from those of other nations and of other times, that a mere republication of existing accounts is not what they require. The story must be told expressly for them. The things that are to be explained, the points that are to be brought out, the comparative degree of prominence to be given to the various particulars, will all be different, on account of the difference in the situation, the ideas, and the objects of these new readers, compared with those of the various other classes of readers which former authors have had in view. It is for this reason, and with this view, that the present series of historical narratives is presented to the public. The author, having had some opportunity to become acquainted with the position, the ideas, and the intellectual wants of those whom he addresses, presents the result of his labors to them, with the hope that it may be found successful in accomplishing its design.

Anabasis

Born in the latter half of the fifth century B.C. near Athens, Xenophon enjoyed the best of educational and social advantages and for a time was a pupil and friend of Socrates. In 401 B.C., however, he was led by promises of adventure and fortune to join the ill-fated expedition of Cyrus against his brother, Artaxerxes the Second of Persia. After Cyrus lost his life and the other officers were murdered, Xenophon became one of the leading spirits of the army, eventually exacting revenge on the Persians, then retiring to Scillus, in Elis, to a life of sporting and literary activity. It was there that he composed the Anabasis, or "Up-Country March," a painstaking but brightly written account of the expedition and his life as a Greek soldier that has endured through the ages. A clearly written historical and literary introduction, copious notes to the text, and a complete vocabulary make this book invaluable to beginning and advanced students alike.

Aristotle

A. E. Taylor's Aristotle is a brilliantly written popular account of the great Greek philosopher and his thought. It is not simply a listing and abstract discussion of ideas, but a searching analysis of Aristotle's thought, both in terms of its contemporary and historical background, and its present application. Written by one of the very greatest Platonic scholars of our day, it is provocative enough to stimulate the expert, and lucid and instructive for the beginner.Dr. Taylor covers the life and works of Aristotle; classification of the sciences; scientific method; formal logic; induction; theory of knowledge; first philosophy; matter & form; the potential and the actual; the four causes; motion and its eternity; God; physics; terrestrial bodies; biology; psychology; grades of psychical life; sensation; common sensibles and the common sense organ; thought; active intelligence; practical philosophy; ethics; society; the theory of the state; music and literature.

Atheism in Pagan Antiquity

In this groundbreaking work, the author traces both the understanding and practice of atheism in the ancient pagan world. Drachmann brings to life these ancient atheists, and their sometimes problematic interactions with theist society.

Dissertation on the Progress of the Fine Arts

"Dissertation on the Progress of the Fine Arts" by John Robert Scott. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Glory That Was Greece: A Survey of Hellenic Culture and Civilisation, The

"The Glory That Was Greece: a survey of Hellenic culture and civilisation" by J. C. Stobart. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Greek Athletic Sports and Festivals

"Greek Athletic Sports and Festivals" by E. Norman Gardiner. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Greek Studies a Series of Essays

I have reserved to the last what is perhaps the daintiest treatment of this subject in classical literature, the account of it which Ovid gives in the Fasti,,a kind of Roman Calendar,,for the seventh of April, the day of the games of Ceres. He tells over again the old story, with much of which, he says, the reader will be already familiar; but he has something also of his own to add to it, which the reader will hear for the first time; and, like one of those old painters who, in depicting a scene of Christian history, drew from their own fancy or experience its special setting and accessories, he translates the story into something very different from the Homeric hymn.

In Greek Waters; A Story of the Grecian War of Independence (1821-1827)

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface.We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Manual of Classical Erotology (De Figuris Veneris)

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface.We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Oeconomicus, [The Economist] a Treatise on the Science of the Household in the Form of a Dialogue

Oeconomicus, [The Economist] A Treatise on the Science of the Household in the form of a Dialogue Xenophon Thank you for checking out this book by Theophania Publishing. We appreciate your business and look forward to serving you soon. We have thousands of titles available, and we invite you to search for us by name, contact us via our website, or download our most recent catalogues. I once heard him discuss the topic of economy after the following manner. Addressing Critobulus, he said: Tell me, Critobulus, is "economy," like the words "medicine," "carpentry," "building," "smithying," "metal working," and so forth, the name of a particular kind of knowledge or science? Crit. Yes, I think so. Soc. And as, in the case of the arts just named, we can state the proper work or function of each, can we (similarly) state the proper work and function of economy? Crit. It must, I should think, be the business of the good economist at any rate to manage his own house or estate well. Soc. And supposing another man's house to be entrusted to him, he would be able, if he chose, to manage it as skilfully as his own, would he not? since a man who is skilled in carpentry can work as well for another as for himself: and this ought to be equally true of the good economist? We are delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive Classic Library collection. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. The aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir of literature, and our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades. The contents of the vast majority of titles in the Classic Library have been scanned from the original works. To ensure a high quality product, each title has been meticulously hand curated by our staff. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with a book that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic work, and that for you it becomes an enriching experience.

Peace

The play is notable for its joyous anticipation of peace and for its celebration of a return to an idyllic life in the countryside. However, it also sounds a note of caution, there is bitterness in the memory of lost opportunities and the ending is not happy for everyone.