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Anathema

Reprint of the original, first published in 1910.

Antonina; Or, the Fall of Rome & Poor Miss Finch

Ancient Rome, AD 408: Young Antonia had the misfortune to live in interesting times , the days when mighty Rome was brought low by the terror of the Goths. Poor Miss Finch (1872) by Wilkie Collins is a novel about a young blind woman who temporarily regains her sight while finding herself in a romantic triangle with two brothers.Twenty-one-year-old Lucilla Finch, the independently wealthy daughter of the rector of Dimchurch, Sussex, has been blind since infancy. Shortly after the narrator, Madame Pratolungo, arrives to serve as her paid companion, Lucilla falls in love with Oscar Dubourg, her shy and reclusive neighbour, also wealthy, who devotes himself to craftsmanship in precious metals.After being attacked and knocked unconscious by robbers, Oscar is nursed by Lucilla and falls in love with her, and the couple become engaged. Their plans are jeopardized by Oscar's epilepsy, a result of the blow to his head. The only effective treatment, a silver compound, has the side-effect of turning his skin a permanent, dark blue-grey. Despite her blindness, Lucilla suffers a violent phobia of dark colours, including dark-complexioned people, and family and friends conceal Oscar's condition from her.Meanwhile, Oscar's twin brother, Nugent, returns from America, where he has dissipated his fortune pursuing a career as a painter. Oscar is devoted to his brother, who is as outgoing, confident and charming as Oscar is diffident and awkward. Knowing of Lucilla's blindness, Nugent has arranged for her to be examined by a famous German oculist, Herr Grosse. Herr Grosse and an English oculist each examine Lucilla but disagree on her prognosis. Lucilla elects to be operated on by Herr Grosse, who believes he can cure her. After the operation, but before the bandages are taken off, Madame Pratolungo pressures Oscar into telling Lucilla of his disfigurement, but his nerve fails and, instead, he tells her it is Nugent who has been disfigured.

Appreciations of Richard Harding Davis

Richard Harding Davis (1864-1916) was a popular writer of fiction and drama, and a journalist famous for his coverage of the Spanish-American War, the Second Boer War, and the First World War. He, a managing editor of Harper's Weekly, was one of the world's leading war correspondents at the time of the Second Boer War in South Africa. As an American, he had the unique opportunity to see the war first-hand from both the English and Boer perspectives. He also worked as a reporter for the New York Herald, The Times, and Scribner's Magazine. He was popular among the leading writers of his time, and was considered the model for illustrator Charles Dana Gibson's dashing Gibson man, the male equivalent of his famous Gibson Girl. He is also referenced early in Sinclair Lewis's book, Dodsworth as the example of an exciting, adventure-seeking legitimate hero.

Are We Ruined by the Germans?

Reproduction of the original: Are we ruined by the Germans? by Harold Cox

Aristotle

A. E. Taylor's Aristotle is a brilliantly written popular account of the great Greek philosopher and his thought. It is not simply a listing and abstract discussion of ideas, but a searching analysis of Aristotle's thought, both in terms of its contemporary and historical background, and its present application. Written by one of the very greatest Platonic scholars of our day, it is provocative enough to stimulate the expert, and lucid and instructive for the beginner.Dr. Taylor covers the life and works of Aristotle; classification of the sciences; scientific method; formal logic; induction; theory of knowledge; first philosophy; matter & form; the potential and the actual; the four causes; motion and its eternity; God; physics; terrestrial bodies; biology; psychology; grades of psychical life; sensation; common sensibles and the common sense organ; thought; active intelligence; practical philosophy; ethics; society; the theory of the state; music and literature.

Armadale (Mystery Classic)

Armadale is a mystery novel. The novel has a convoluted plot about two distant cousins both named Allan Armadale. The father of one had murdered the father of the other (the two fathers are also named Allan Armadale). The story starts with a deathbed confession by the murderer in the form of a letter to be given to his baby son when he grows up. Wilkie Collins (1824 - 1889) was an English novelist, playwright, and author of short stories. His best-known works are The Woman in White, No Name, Armadale, and The Moonstone.

Around the Yule Log

Reproduction of the original: Around the Yule Log by Willis Boyd Allen

At Bay

Reproduction of the original: At Bay by Mrs. Alexander

At the Mercy of Tiberius

Reproduction of the original: At the Mercy of Tiberius by Augusta Jane Evans

Atala: Rene

Two classic tales together in one full length novel, each espousing the original virtues of Christianity and written by the founder of Romanticism in French literature "Atala," published in 1801, tells the tragic tale of the eponymous heroine, the mixed-race Christian daughter of a Native American chief, who saves the captured Chactas and tragically falls in love with him. "Ren?," published the following year, is the seminal portrait of the sensitive and world-weary young Romantic hero who attempts to flee civilization and pursue a life in the wilderness of Louisiana. Referred to by their author as his "passionate twins" and intended to provide an illustration of the original, primitive virtues of Christianity, the two novellas were hugely successful in their time, thanks to their vivid depictions of exotic locations and their attunement to the emotional sensitivities of the age. Even more significantly, they helped shape European Romantic archetypes which would bear resonance throughout the 19th century and profoundly mark its literature and art in general.

Atala: Rene

Two classic tales together in one full length novel, each espousing the original virtues of Christianity and written by the founder of Romanticism in French literature "Atala," published in 1801, tells the tragic tale of the eponymous heroine, the mixed-race Christian daughter of a Native American chief, who saves the captured Chactas and tragically falls in love with him. "Ren?," published the following year, is the seminal portrait of the sensitive and world-weary young Romantic hero who attempts to flee civilization and pursue a life in the wilderness of Louisiana. Referred to by their author as his "passionate twins" and intended to provide an illustration of the original, primitive virtues of Christianity, the two novellas were hugely successful in their time, thanks to their vivid depictions of exotic locations and their attunement to the emotional sensitivities of the age. Even more significantly, they helped shape European Romantic archetypes which would bear resonance throughout the 19th century and profoundly mark its literature and art in general.

Australian Search Party

Reproduction of the original: Australian Search Party by Charles Henry Eden

Averil

Reproduction of the original: Averil by Rosa Nouchette Carey

Babylonian and Assyrian Laws, Contracts and Letters

Reproduction of the original: Babylonian and Assyrian Laws, Contracts and Letters by C.H.W. Johns

Bach

Reproduction of the original: Bach by C.F. Abdy Williams

Ballads, Kidnapped & Catriona

The central character and narrator is 17-year-old David Balfour. (Balfour is Stevenson's mother's maiden name.) His parents have recently died, and he is out to make his way in the world. He is given a letter by the minister of Essendean, Mr. Campbell, to be delivered to the House of Shaws in Cramond, where David's uncle, Ebenezer Balfour, lives.David arrives at the ominous House of Shaws and is confronted by his paranoid Uncle Ebenezer, who is armed with a blunderbuss. His uncle is also miserly, living on "parritch" and small ale, and the House of Shaws itself is partially unfinished and somewhat ruinous. David is allowed to stay and soon discovers evidence that his father may have been older than his uncle, thus making David the rightful heir to the estate. Ebenezer asks David to get a chest from the top of a tower in the house but refuses to provide a lamp or candle. David is forced to scale the stairs in the dark and realises that not only is the tower unfinished in some places, but the steps simply end abruptly and fall into an abyss. David concludes that his uncle intended for him to have an "accident" so as not to have to give over his nephew's inheritance.David confronts his uncle, who promises to tell David the whole story of his father the next morning. A ship's cabin boy, Ransome, arrives the next day and tells Ebenezer that Captain Hoseason of the brig Covenant needs to meet him to discuss business. Ebenezer takes David to a pier on the Firth of Forth, where Hoseason awaits, and David makes the mistake of leaving his uncle alone with the captain while he visits the shore with Ransome. Hoseason later offers to take them on board the brig briefly, and David complies, only to see his uncle returning to shore alone in a skiff. David is then immediately struck senseless.The book begins precisely where Kidnapped ends, at 2 pm on 25 August 1751, outside the British Linen Company in Edinburgh, Scotland.The first part of the book recounts the attempts of the hero, David Balfour, to gain justice for James Stewart (James of the Glens), who has been arrested and charged with complicity in the Appin Murder. David makes a statement to a lawyer and goes on to meet William Grant of Prestongrange, the Lord Advocate of Scotland, to press the case for James' innocence. However, his attempts fail, as after being reunited with Alan Breck he is once again kidnapped, and confined on the Bass Rock, an island in the Firth of Forth, until the trial is over, and James is condemned to death. David also meets and falls in love with Catriona MacGregor Drummond, the daughter of James MacGregor Drummond, known as James More (who was Rob Roy's eldest son), also held in prison, whose escape she engineers. David also receives some education in the manners and morals of polite society from Barbara Grant, Prestongrange's daughter.In the second part, David and Catriona travel to Holland, where David studies law at the University of Leyden. David takes Catriona under his protection (she having no money) until her father finds them. James More eventually arrives and proves something of a disappointment, drinking a great deal and showing no compunction against living off David's largesse. At this time, David learns of the death of his uncle Ebenezer, and thus gains knowledge that he has come into his full, substantial inheritance. David and Catriona, fast friends at this point, begin a series of misunderstandings that eventually drive her and James More away, although David sends payment to James in return for news of Catriona's welfare. James and Catriona find their way to Dunkirk in northern France. Meanwhile, Alan Breck joins David in Leyden, and he berates David for not understanding women.

Ben-Hur: A Story of the Christ

Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ chronicles the journey of Judah Ben-Hur and the life of Jesus, from Ben-Hur's quest for vengeance against the Romans and his search for his imprisoned family to the birth of Jesus in the manger and the Crucifixion. Cleverly connecting two storylines to create both an exciting tale of adventure - with shipwrecks, chariot races, and duels - and a compelling story of love and spiritual growth, Ben-Hur has continued to engage readers and entertain audiences for more than a century. Once the best-selling and most widely read American novel, and the first work of fiction to be blessed by a Pope, Ben-Hur's popularity and esteem have given rise to numerous stage and film adaptations since the novel's first publication in 1880. This replica of the beautifully illustrated "Player's Edition" features nearly fifty images of scenes and characters from the play that will surely delight any reader of this classic piece of historical fiction. LEWIS "LEW" WALLACE (1827-1905) was born in Brookville, Indiana. He worked as an attorney, was elected to the State Senate of Indiana, and served as a Union general in the American Civil War before writing his most famous book, Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ. His other works include The Boyhood of Christ, Life of Gen. Ben Harrison, and The Prince of India; or, Why Constantinople Fell, as well as an autobiography and several other titles. Wallace also served as governor of the New Mexico Territory.

Beulah

Written when the author was 18 and published in 1859, "Beulah" sold over 22,000 copies in the first year of publication - a monumentaal achievement.

Beyond the Black Waters (Illustrated Edition)

Tucker (1821-93) was a prolific writer for adults and children who used the pseudonym A.L.O.E. (A Lady of England). Late in life she spent a period as a volunteer missionary in India where she died. Her father was twice elected chairman of the East India Company and she had a secular upbringing in London, her first writings being poems and plays to amuse the family. In 1847 she took charge of the education of her brother's three children and her earliest published work The Claremont Tales (1852) was, she said, "originally composed for young children under my charge". Her work as a children's writer was imbued with her Evangelical religious beliefs and most of her stories were allegories with a clear moral which were rendered with a degree of realism. Much of her output of over 150 titles appeared first in magazines before being collected into books and she often devoted the proceeds from her writing to missionary or charity work. Her realistic portrayals of the poor were undoubtedly drawn from her experience as a workhouse visitor. In 1875, aged 54 and having taught herself Hindustani, she set out for India where she worked as a self-supporting volunteer missionary to Amritsar, Punjab, through the Indian Female Normal School and Instruction Society. Three years later she moved to nearby Batala where she worked in a boys' school and as a teacher of Christian beliefs to native women. Many of her most interesting stories are set in India and some were translated into Indian languages. This work, which includes two illustrations, was first published in 1890.

Beyond the Frontier a Romance of Early Days in the Middle West

1915. With frontispiece by Troy and Margaret West Kinney. The book begins: It was early autumn, for the clusters of grapes above me were already purple, and the forest leaves were tinged with red. And yet the air was soft, and the golden bars of sun flickered down on the work in my lap through the laced branches of the trellis. The work was but a pretense, for I had fled the house to escape the voice of Monsieur Cassion who was still urging my uncle to accompany him on his journey into the wilderness. They sat in the great room before the fireplace, drinking, and I had heard enough already to tell me there was treachery on foot against the Sieur de la Salle. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

Birds and Bees – Sharp Eyes – and Other Papers

Reproduction of the original: Birds and Bees - Sharp Eyes - and other Papers by John Burroughs

Black Rock – a Tale of the Selkirks

This volume contains Ralph Connor's novel (published in 1900), "Black Rock - A Tale of the Selkirks". Set in a mining and lumberjack boom town in the 1880s, this literary work centres on a new minister who brings the fight for men's souls to the doors of the seedy saloons and dastardly drug pushers. Plots, fights, and double-crosses abound in the back-and-forth battle played out in the lives of several well-developed characters. Rev. Dr. Charles William Gordon (1860 - 1937) was a Canadian author who sold more than five million copies of his books during his lifetime. Many vintage texts such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive, and it is with this in mind that we are republishing this book now, in an affordable, high-quality, modern edition. It comes complete with a specially commissioned biography of the author.

Bob Dexter and the Storm Mountain Mystery Or, the Secret of the Log Cabin

"Bob Dexter and the Storm Mountain Mystery" is a 1925 Western novel by Willard F. Baker. Part of the "The Boy Rancher" series, it is an exciting detective story for children set in the American Old West. A fantastic tale of mystery and adventure, this novel is highly recommend fans and collectors of classic Western fiction. Other novels by this author include: "Bob Dexter And The Beacon Beach Mystery" (1925), "Bob Dexter And The Aeroplane Mystery" (1930), and "The Boy Ranchers On The Trail" (1921). Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially commissioned new introduction on the history of Western fiction.

Brazilian Sketches

Reproduktion des Originals: Brazilian Sketches von T.B. Ray

Brought Forward

Reproduction of the original: Brought Forward by R.B. Cunninghame Graham

Buffalo Bill From Prairie to Palace; An Authentic History of the Wild West, With Sketches, Stories of Adventure, and Anecdotes of Buffalo Bill, the Hero of the Plains

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Bulfinch’s Mythology: The Age of Fable

Reproduction of the original: Bulfinch's Mythology: The Age Of Fable by Thomas Bulfinch

Bull-Dog Drummond – the Adventures of a Demobilised Officer Who Found Peace Dull

This volume book contains Cyril McNeile's 1920 novel, "Bulldog Drummond". Bored with life, ex-British Army Captain Hugh "Bulldog" Drummond places an advert in 'The Times' - expressing his desire for an adventure. Surprisingly, he receives a reply from a young woman who is worried about some of her father's business acquaintances and wants to escape. It is an entertaining adventure story full of mystery and intrigue that will not disappoint fans of McNeile's work. Herman Cyril McNeile (1888 - 1937) was a British author who served in the Army. Many vintage texts such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive, and it is with this in mind that we are republishing this book now, in an affordable, high-quality, modern edition. It comes complete with a specially commissioned biography of the author.