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A Book of the Pyrenees

The Pyrenees stand up as a natural wall of demarcation between two nations, the French and the Spaniards, just as the mountains of Dauphin? sever the French from the Italians. It has been remarked that these natural barriers are thrown up to part Romance-speaking peoples, whereas the mountain ranges sink to comparative insignificance between the French and the Germans. Over the Jura the French tongue has flowed up the Rhone to Sierre, above the Lake of Geneva, so the Spanish or Catalan has overleaped the Pyrenees in Roussillon, and the Basque tongue has those who speak it in both cis-Pyrenean and trans-Pyrenean Navarre. The Pyrenees are the upcurled lips of the huge limestone sea-bed, that at some vastly remote period was snapped from east to west, and through the fissure thus formed the granite was thrust, lifting along with it the sedimentary rocks.Consequently the Pyrenees consist of from two to three parallel chains. The central and loftiest is that of granite, but where loftiest is hidden on the north side by the upturned reef of limestone. On the south the calcareous bed is lifted in great slabs, but split, and does not form so ragged and so lofty a range.The Pyrenees start steeply out of the Mediterranean, which at a distance of five-and-twenty miles from Cape Creuse, has a depth of over 500 fathoms, and there the limestone flares white and bald in the line of the Alb?res. But to the west the chain does not drop abruptly into the Atlantic, but trails away for 300 miles, forming the Asturian mountains, and then, curving south, serves to part Galicia from Leon. The range of the Pyrenees dividing France from Spain is 350 miles in length.The chain to the west wears a different aspect from that in the east. The Basque mountains are clothed with trees, pines and birch, walnut and chestnut, and above them are turf and heather. But the eastern extremity is white and barren. This is due to the fact that the Western Pyrenees catch and condense the vapours from the Atlantic, whereas the Oriental Pyrenees do not draw to them heavy and continuous rains. The boundary between the regions and climates is Mont Carlitte. In the Western Pyrenees the snow line lies far lower than in the east. On the former of these glaciers hang in wreaths, whereas there are none in the east. The contrast between the northern and southern slopes is even more marked than that between the extremities of the chain. On the French side are snow, ice, running streams, fertile vales, luxuriant meadows and forests, and valleys and hillsides that sparkle with villages smiling in prosperity. But on the southern slope the eye ranges over barren rocks, sun-baked, scanty pastures, and here and there at long intervals occur squalid clusters of stone hovels, scarce fit to shelter goats, yet serving as human habitations.

A Dictionary of English and Folk-Names of British Birds – With Their History, Meaning and First Usage – and the Folk Lore, Weather Lore, Legends, E.T.C. Relating to the More Familiar Species

Originally published in 1913. This fascinating book contains detailed information on nearly 5000 bird names, including provincial, local and dialect names indicating the locality and meaning where possible. The Welsh, Gaelic, Cornish and some Irish names have also been added. Many of the earliest bird books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. Home Farm Books are republishing many of these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms, and Superstitions of Ireland: With Sketches of the Irish Past

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface.We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Antar, a Bedoueen Romance. Translated … By Terrick Hamilton

This is a reproduction of the original artefact. Generally these books are created from careful scans of the original. This allows us to preserve the book accurately and present it in the way the author intended. Since the original versions are generally quite old, there may occasionally be certain imperfections within these reproductions. We're happy to make these classics available again for future generations to enjoy!

Aucassin Et Nicolete: The Poetry of Gender and Growing Up in the French Middle Ages

This book has two aims - to introduce new readers to the riches of Old French storytelling and the culture from which it arose and, secondly, to suggest a way out of the impasse apparent in current criticism of Aucassin et Nicolete. Each chapter of the bo

Barlaam and Ioasaph

This inspirational book is about the life of Prince Iosaph who is brought up in the lap of luxury. He sees human sufferings for the first time when he meets a sick old beggar. This encounter leads Iosaph to search for his faith. His quest leads him to Barlaam, a monk, who introduces him to Christianity. Several powerful moments in the book keep the readers engrossed till the end. Enlightening!

Colin

From the acclaimed author of Mapp and Lucia comes the gothic tale of a cursed aristocratic family and two brothers vying to claim its dark legacy. On a visit to the Sussex town of Rye, Queen Elizabeth I found herself captivated?and soon seduced?by a penniless young shepherd named Colin Stanier. According to family legend, their encounter was orchestrated by the devil himself. Colin had made a Faustian bargain to win success in all of life?s endeavors; a bargain that would be kept in the family by generations of eldest sons, so long as they maintain the Satanic covenant. ? Centuries later, Raymond Stanier is the rightful inheritor of the family mansion and fortune. But his younger twin brother, Colin, who bears a striking resemblance to the portrait of his namesake, is willing to lie, seduce, and perhaps even kill to take the family seat for himself. ? This saga of ambition, evil, and sensuality moves between generations and across the world from Rye to London, Naples, and Capri. ?A story of greed and treachery, sibling rivalry, simmering passions and strange desires, Colin is compulsive reading? (Peter Burton). ?This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

Cornish Characters and Strange Events

"Cornish Characters and Strange Events" by S. Baring-Gould. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Faust, Part 1 (Translated by Anna Swanwick With an Introduction by F. H. Hedge)

Considered by many as Johann Goethe's magnum opus, "Faust" has a peculiar history of composition and publication. What began as a project in Goethe's youth, at the age of twenty, in 1769, "Faust" would not fully be completed until 1831 very near the end of the author's life. Based on the German legend of Johann Georg Faust, a magician of the German Renaissance who reportedly gained his mystical powers by selling his immortal soul to the devil, the Faustian legend has forever come to symbolize the inherent peril in dealing with unscrupulous characters and supernatural forces. Presented here in this volume is the first part of "Faust," which begins with a prologue in heaven in which we find god challenging the devil that he cannot lead astray one of his favorite scholars, Dr. Faust. The devil, known in the play as Mephistopheles, accepts the challenge and so begins the struggle of Faust between the allure of supernatural power and the fate of his soul. Despite numerous adaptations, Goethe's "Faust" stands out as arguably the most famous version of this legend. Only Christopher Marlowe's "Dr. Faustus" can be claimed to rival it for that position. This edition is printed on premium acid-free paper, is translated by Anna Swanwick, and includes an introduction by F. H. Hedge.

Folk Lore and Legends Russian and Polish

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.