Campfire Girls’ Outing: Or Ethel Hollister’s Second Summer in Camp (1918)

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

Christmas Short Works Collection 2008

The multilingual Christmas Short Works Collection 2008, containing public domain short stories, essays, poems, hymns, and scripture passages recorded by a variety of LibriVox members.

Claire D’Albe: An English Translation

Both Claire and her husband, M. d'Albe, are virtuous and upstanding, and Fr?d?ric, her husband's nineteen-year-old adopted son and factory assistant, is honest and noble-hearted. But in the beautiful and secluded Loire Valley, the friendship between Claire and Fr?d?ric gradually develops into a forbidden passion.Claire d'Albe (1799) was audacious in its day for its representation of adulterous love as a positive act of self-fulfillment. As the volume editor, Margaret Cohen, indicates, Sophie Cottin's best-selling work of sentimentalism highlights the tension in Enlightenment liberalism between collective welfare and personal happiness. Although such later French authors as Stendhal and Balzac denigrated sentimentalism along with female novelists, Claire d'Albe influenced their realist aesthetics.

Collected Travel Writings: Great Britain and America

"Try to be one of the people on whom nothing is lost!" Henry James as a traveler amply fulfilled his own famous directive to aspiring novelists. Collected here for the first time in two volumes, James's travel books and essays display his distinctive charm and vivacity of style, his sensuous response to the beauty of place, and his penetrating, sometimes sardonically amusing analysis of national characteristics and customs. Observant, alert, imaginative, these works remain unsurpassed guides to the countries they describe, and they form an important part of James's extraodinary achievement in literature. This volume brings together James's writings on Great Britain and America. The essays of "English Hours" convey the freshness of James's "wonderments and judgements and emotions" on first encountering the country that became his adopted home for half a century. He captures the immensely varied life of London in a series of walks through that "murky, modern Babylon, " which contains"the most romantic townvistas in the world." Lively vignettes of a winter visit to an unfashionable watering place and excursions to the cathedral towns of Wells and Salisbury are followed by a haunting evocation of the desolate Suffolk coast at Dunwich. James includes vivid accounts of New Year's weekend at a perfectly appointed country house, midsummer dog days in London, and the spectacle of the Derby at Epsom. In every essay he enriches his portrait of the English Character, governed by social conventions and yet prone to startling eccentricities. Joseph Pennell's delightful illustrations, which appeared in the original 1905 edition, are reprinted with James's text.In "The American Scene"(1907) James revisits his native country after a twenty-year absence, traveling throughout the eastern United States from Boston to Florida. Views of the Hudson River arouse memories of his own past - the river "seemed to stretch back... to the earliest outlook of my consiousness, " he writes. James's poignant rediscovery of what remained of the New York of his childhood ("the precious stretch of space between Washington Square and Fourteenth Street") contrasts with his impression of the modern commercial New York, a new city representing "a particular type of dauntless power, ... crowned not only with no history, but with no credible possiblity of time for history." Edmund Wilson, who praised "The American Scene" 's "magnificent solidity and brilliance, " remarked that "it was as if...his emotions had suddenly been given scope, his genius for expression liberated."Sixteen essays on traveling in England, Scotland, and America conclude this volume. The essays, most of which have never before been collected, range from early pieces on London, Saratoga, and Newport, to articles on World War I that are among James's final writings.

Collected Travel Writings: Great Britain and America

"Try to be one of the people on whom nothing is lost!" Henry James as a traveler amply fulfilled his own famous directive to aspiring novelists. Collected here for the first time in two volumes, James's travel books and essays display his distinctive charm and vivacity of style, his sensuous response to the beauty of place, and his penetrating, sometimes sardonically amusing analysis of national characteristics and customs. Observant, alert, imaginative, these works remain unsurpassed guides to the countries they describe, and they form an important part of James's extraodinary achievement in literature. This volume brings together James's writings on Great Britain and America. The essays of "English Hours" convey the freshness of James's "wonderments and judgements and emotions" on first encountering the country that became his adopted home for half a century. He captures the immensely varied life of London in a series of walks through that "murky, modern Babylon, " which contains"the most romantic townvistas in the world." Lively vignettes of a winter visit to an unfashionable watering place and excursions to the cathedral towns of Wells and Salisbury are followed by a haunting evocation of the desolate Suffolk coast at Dunwich. James includes vivid accounts of New Year's weekend at a perfectly appointed country house, midsummer dog days in London, and the spectacle of the Derby at Epsom. In every essay he enriches his portrait of the English Character, governed by social conventions and yet prone to startling eccentricities. Joseph Pennell's delightful illustrations, which appeared in the original 1905 edition, are reprinted with James's text.In "The American Scene"(1907) James revisits his native country after a twenty-year absence, traveling throughout the eastern United States from Boston to Florida. Views of the Hudson River arouse memories of his own past - the river "seemed to stretch back... to the earliest outlook of my consiousness, " he writes. James's poignant rediscovery of what remained of the New York of his childhood ("the precious stretch of space between Washington Square and Fourteenth Street") contrasts with his impression of the modern commercial New York, a new city representing "a particular type of dauntless power, ... crowned not only with no history, but with no credible possiblity of time for history." Edmund Wilson, who praised "The American Scene" 's "magnificent solidity and brilliance, " remarked that "it was as if...his emotions had suddenly been given scope, his genius for expression liberated."Sixteen essays on traveling in England, Scotland, and America conclude this volume. The essays, most of which have never before been collected, range from early pieces on London, Saratoga, and Newport, to articles on World War I that are among James's final writings.

Coriolanus

The New Cambridge Shakespeare appeals to students worldwide for its up-to-date scholarship and emphasis on performance. The series features line-by-line commentaries and textual notes on the plays and poems. Introductions are regularly refreshed with accounts of new critical, stage and screen interpretations. This second edition of Coriolanus, edited by Lee Bliss, provides a thorough reconsideration of what was probably Shakespeare's last tragedy. In the introduction, Bliss situates the play within its contemporary social and political contexts and pays particular attention to Shakespeare's manipulation of his primary source in Plutarch's Lives. The edition is alert to the play's theatrical potential, while the stage history also attends to the politics of performance from the 1680s onwards, including European productions following the Second World War. A new introductory section by Bridget Escolme accounts for recent theatrical productions as well as scholarly criticism of the last decade, with particular emphasis on gender and politics.

Criticism and Fiction: From “Literature and Life”

As a prominent novelist, critic and editor, William Dean Howells played an essential role in shaping the American literary sensibility of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly the shift toward naturalism and realism. In this, his most widely read series of essays on literature, Howells lays out his view of the superiority of realistic fiction.

Dalziels’ Illustrated Goldsmith … And a Sketch of the Life of Oliver Goldsmith

PREFACE. THE Author of this very practical treatise on Scotch Loch - Fishing desires clearly that it may be of use to all who had it. He does not pretend to have written anything new, but to have attempted to put what he has to say in as readable a form as possible. Everything in the way of the history and habits of fish has been studiously avoided, and technicalities have been used as sparingly as possible. The writing of this book has afforded him pleasure in his leisure moments, and that pleasure would be much increased if he knew that the perusal of it would create any bond of sympathy between himself and the angling community in general. This section is interleaved with blank shects for the readers notes. The Author need hardly say that any suggestions addressed to the case of the publishers, will meet with consideration in a future edition. We do not pretend to write or enlarge upon a new subject. Much has been said and written-and well said and written too on the art of fishing but loch-fishing has been rather looked upon as a second-rate performance, and to dispel this idea is one of the objects for which this present treatise has been written. Far be it from us to say anything against fishing, lawfully practised in any form but many pent up in our large towns will bear us out when me say that, on the whole, a days loch-fishing is the most convenient. One great matter is, that the loch-fisher is depend- ent on nothing but enough wind to curl the water, -and on a large loch it is very seldom that a dead calm prevails all day, -and can make his arrangements for a day, weeks beforehand whereas the stream- fisher is dependent for a good take on the state of the water and however pleasant and easy it may be for one living near the banks of a good trout stream or river, it is quite another matter to arrange for a days river-fishing, if one is looking forward to a holiday at a date some weeks ahead. Providence may favour the expectant angler with a good day, and the water in order but experience has taught most of us that the good days are in the minority, and that, as is the case with our rapid running streams, -such as many of our northern streams are, -the water is either too large or too small, unless, as previously remarked, you live near at hand, and can catch it at its best. A common belief in regard to loch-fishing is, that the tyro and the experienced angler have nearly the same chance in fishing, -the one from the stern and the other from the bow of the same boat. Of all the absurd beliefs as to loch-fishing, this is one of the most absurd. Try it. Give the tyro either end of the boat he likes give him a cast of ally flies he may fancy, or even a cast similar to those which a crack may be using and if he catches one for every three the other has, he may consider himself very lucky. Of course there are lochs where the fish are not abundant, and a beginner may come across as many as an older fisher but we speak of lochs where there are fish to be caught, and where each has a fair chance. Again, it is said that the boatman has as much to do with catching trout in a loch as the angler. Well, we dont deny that. In an untried loch it is necessary to have the guidance of a good boatman but the same argument holds good as to stream-fishing...

De Profundis

Renowned as a wit, poet, dramatist and one of the great conversationalists of his age, Oscar Wilde (1854?1900) nevertheless fell victim to the forces of repression and prudery in late Victorian England. As a result of his affair with Lord Alfred Douglas, Wilde was found guilty of homosexual offenses and jailed for two years.While in prison, he wrote De Profundis, a long and bitter letter of recrimination addressed to Douglas. In it, he accuses Douglas of shallowness, selfishness, greed, gross interference with his [Wilde's] artistic efforts and other faults and wrongdoing. Nevertheless, it is clear from this letter that Wilde deeply loved Douglas and still harbored strong feelings for him, in spite of Douglas' role in Wilde's downfall. While the letter is a touching cri de coeur that offers fascinating insights into Wilde's life in prison and the background and psychology of a notorious affair, its eloquence, passion, and literary excellence raise it above the level of the purely personal. Instead, it becomes a universal statement about love, injustice and the pain of living in the world.

Doomsday Eve: Science Fiction Stories

The legends clustering around the new people began before the war, while the man who started the group, old Jal Jonnor, was alive, but they received their greatest circulation during the conflict.If the war is long and the fighting is bitter, with neither side able to achieve victory or even a substantial advantage, soldiers eventually begin to tell strange stories of sights seen when death is near, of miraculous deliveries from destruction, of impossible ships seen above the Earth, and even of non-human allies fighting on their side. Psychologists, given to believing only what they can see, feel, hear, or measure, generally have credited these stories to hallucinations resulting from long-sustained stress, or, in the case of the non-human allies, to plain, wishful thinking rising out of a deep feeling of insecurity. What psychologist was ever willing to believe that an angel suddenly took over the controls of a falling fighting plane, righting the ship and bringing it down to Earth in a crash landing that enabled the wounded pilot to crawl away, then curing the wound the pilot had sustained?Red-Dog Jimmie Thurman swore this happened to him. He had tangled with an Asian fighter group escorting a hot, high level bomber over the north pole. This was in the early days of the war when such bombers still slipped through the defenses occasionally. Red-Dog Jimmie Thurman had got one of the fighters with a single burst from his guns and was pushing his jet straight up at the soft belly of the bomber far overhead when a shell, from an Asian fighter that he had not seen, knocked off half of his right wing. A fragment of the exploding shell hit him in the right shoulder, mangling the flesh and the bone.Spinning like a leaf being whirled over and over in a hurricane, the plane started the long plunge downward toward the polar ice cap below. Jimmie couldn't work the seat ejection mechanism because of his broken arm.

Dreams

This early work by Jerome K. Jerome was originally published in the early 20th century and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'Dreams' is a short essay on dreams by this humorous author. Jerome Klapka Jerome was born in Walsall, England in 1859. Both his parents died while he was in his early teens, and he was forced to quit school to support himself. In 1889, Jerome published his most successful and best-remembered work, 'Three Men in a Boat'. Featuring himself and two of his friends encountering humorous situations while floating down the Thames in a small boat, the book was an instant success, and has never been out of print. In fact, its popularity was such that the number of registered Thames boats went up fifty percent in the year following its publication.

Egypt (La Mort De Philae)

This is the 1908 English translation of Pierre Loti's travelogue concerning Egypt: "La Mort de Philae". This fascinating and easy-to-read volume will appeal to readers with an interest in Egypt in the early 20th century, and it is not to be missed by fans and collectors of vintage travel writing. Contents include: "A Winter Midnight Before The Great Sphinx", "The Mosques Of Cairo", "The Hall Of The Mummies", A Centre Of Islam", "In The Tombs Of The Apis", "The Outskirts Of Cairo", "Archaic Christianity", "The Race Of Bronze", "A Charming Luncheon", "The Downfall Of The Nile", etc. Pierre Loti (14 January 1850 - 10 June 1923) was a French novelist and naval officer most famous for his exotic novels. Due to his career as an officer in the navy travelling the world, he was able to imbue his work with a real authenticity, presented with a mastery of language and narrative rivalled by few others. Other notable works by this author include: "P?cheur d'Islande" (1886), "Madame Chrysanth?me" (1887), and "Ramuntcho" (1897). Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. It is with this in mind that we are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially commissioned new biography of the author.

English and Scottish Popular Ballads, Volume 2, Part 2, The

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

English Verse – Specimens Illustrating Its Principles and History

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Escorial: A Historical and Descriptive Account of the Spanish Royal Palace, Monastery and Mausoleum, The

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface.We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Essays and Lectures

This early work by Oscar Wilde was originally published in 1879 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. . 'Essays and Lectures' is an important collection of Wilde's essays, lectures, reviews, letters, and short prose pieces. Oscar Wilde was born in Dublin in 1854. He studied at Trinity College, Dublin, and subsequently won a scholarship to Magdalen College, Oxford, where he was heavily influenced by John Ruskin and Walter Pate. In 1892, Wilde gained commercial and critical success with 'Lady Windermere's Fan', and followed it with the comedy 'A Woman of No Importance' (1893) and 'An Ideal Husband' (1895). Next to arrive was Wilde's most famous play, 'The Importance of Being Earnest' - a farcical comedy which cemented his artistic reputation and is now seen as his masterpiece.

Essays and Tales (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from Essays and Tales Public Credit, and it did touch on the position of the country at a time when the shock of change caused by the Revolution of 1688 - 89, and also the strain of foreign war, were being severely felt. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Essays Before a Sonata

Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - Charles Ives (1874-1954) was probably one of the most psycho - intellectually brilliant, imaginative and flexible Americans to ever "walk the land of free-dom." A graduate of Yale, he became a multi-millio-naire in the American insurance industry, introducing brilliant innovations within that industry. He also, unlike a few composers, found the time and the money (being a shrewd and practical businessman) to get married and have children. His accomplishments for which he is best known, however, are those in the field of music. At the time of its composition, Ives' music was probably the most radically modern in history, and by itself had enough material to serve as the foundation of modern 20th century music. For example, at the turn of the century, this eccentric composer created band works featuring multiple melodies of multiple time signatures opposing and complimenting each other within the same piece. Ives was also a revolutionary atonal composer, who created, essentially without precedent, many atonal works that not only pre-date those of Schoenberg, but are just as sophisticated, and arguably even more so, than those of the 12-tone serialist.

Essays in English Literature, 1780-1860

This volume contains a collection of critical literary essays written by George Saintsbury. The writers dealt with in these criticisms include De Quincey, Sydney Smith, George Crabbe, and many more. This volume is recommended for students of English literature, and it will be of considerable utility to those with an interest in important nineteenth century writers. The essays include: "Crabbe", "Hogg", "Sydney Smith", "Jeffrey", "Hazlitt", "Moore", "Leigh Hunt", "Peacock", "Wilson", "De Quincey", "Lockhart", "Praed", and "Borrow". George Edward Bateman Saintsbury (1845 - 1933) was an English Author, scholar, and critic. Many vintage texts such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive, and it is with this in mind that we are republishing this book now, in an affordable, high-quality, modern edition. It comes complete with a specially commissioned biography of the author.

Essays of Michel De Montaigne (Complete): Translated by Charles Cotton. Edited by William Carew Hazlitt., The

This book is a result of an effort made by us towards making a contribution to the preservation and repair of original classic literature. In an attempt to preserve, improve and recreate the original content, we have worked towards: 1. Type-setting & Reformatting: The complete work has been re-designed via professional layout, formatting and type-setting tools to re-create the same edition with rich typography, graphics, high quality images, and table elements, giving our readers the feel of holding a 'fresh and newly' reprinted and/or revised edition, as opposed to other scanned & printed (Optical Character Recognition - OCR) reproductions. 2. Correction of imperfections: As the work was re-created from the scratch, therefore, it was vetted to rectify certain conventional norms with regard to typographical mistakes, hyphenations, punctuations, blurred images, missing content/pages, and/or other related subject matters, upon our consideration. Every attempt was made to rectify the imperfections related to omitted constructs in the original edition via other references. However, a few of such imperfections which could not be rectified due to intentionalunintentional omission of content in the original edition, were inherited and preserved from the original work to maintain the authenticity and construct, relevant to the work. We believe that this work holds historical, cultural and/or intellectual importance in the literary works community, therefore despite the oddities, we accounted the work for print as a part of our continuing effort towards preservation of literary work and our contribution towards the development of the society as a whole, driven by our beliefs. We are grateful to our readers for putting their faith in us and accepting our imperfections with regard to preservation of the historical content. HAPPY READING!

Essays on the Art of Writing and Fables

ESSAYS ON THE ART OF WRITING collects seven important essays on authorship, including "On Some Technical Elements of Style" and "The Morality of the Profession of Letters," as well as Robert Louis Stevenson's accounts of writing Treasure Island and The Master of Ballantrae. Written more than a century ago, these essays are full of insight for today's readers and brimming with still-applicable wisdom for modern writers. Stevenson's collection of twenty FABLES has little to do with conventional lessons of right and wrong. His allegorical parables offer, instead, what the author called "tail foremost moralities." Stevenson slices through societal fa?ades of hypocrisy, bigotry, and stupidity with sardonic wit more akin to Monty Python than Aesop. Some of the darker tales may remind one of the works of Edgar Allan Poe or Ambrose Bierce. Odd and evocative, amusing and thought provoking, Stevenson's fables might prove more appropriate for our day and age than his own. A posthumous collection, Essays in the Art of Writing (also known as The Art of Writing and Other Essays), gathered some of Stevenson's important essays on authorship. It was first published in 1905 by Chatto and Windus. The collected Fables was also a postumous publication. Stevenson proposed a book of fables to publisher Longmans, Green and Co. in the spring of 1888, but never presented the publisher with a manuscript. After his death in 1894, the fables he had written were published by Longmans in its magazine (1895). The following year, they were included in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with Other Fables, a new edition of his famous 1886 novella. The fables were first published separately in 1902 by Longmans, Green and Co. in an illustrated edition with six etchings by Ethel King Martyn. Although both collections have been reprinted in several forms, this is the first time the two have been combined in a one-volume edition.

Exile Book of Canadian Dog Stories, The

Spanning from the 1800s to 2005, and featuring exceptional short stories from 28 of Canada's most prominent fiction writers, this unique anthology explores the nature of the human-dog bond through writing from both the nation's earliest storytellers,such as Ernest Thompson Seton, L. M. Montgomery, and Stephen Leacock,and a younger generation that includes Lynn Coady and Matt Shaw. Not simply sentimental tales about noble dogs doing heroic deeds, these stories represent the rich, complex, and mysterious bond between dogs and humans. Adventure and drama, heartfelt encounters and nostalgia, sharp-edged satire, and even fantasy make up the genres in this memorable collection, chosen by a critically acclaimed fiction writer who has sought essential reading that will appeal to dog lovers of every persuasion. There are city pets, country dogs, childhood companions, as well as a strange stone-dog statue, all ready to entertain and haunt readers, reminding them of their own beloved dogs, past and present. By way of Newfoundland to British Columbia,with a few stops in Europe, too,dogs of all breeds, shapes, and sizes inhabit these pages, showing what Canadians have sometimes made of their dogs, and what they've made of their people in return.

Familiar Studies of Men and Books & Travels With a Donkey in the C?vennes

Travels with a Donkey in the C?vennes (1879) is one of Robert Louis Stevenson's earliest published works and is considered a pioneering classic of outdoor literature.Stevenson was in his late 20s and still dependent on his parents for support. His journey was designed to provide material for publication while allowing him to distance himself from a love affair with an American woman of which his friends and families did not approve and who had returned to her husband in California.Travels recounts Stevenson's 12-day, 200-kilometre (120 mi) solo hiking journey through the sparsely populated and impoverished areas of the C?vennes mountains in south-central France in 1878.The terrain, with its barren rocky heather-filled hillsides, he often compared to parts of Scotland. The other principal character is Modestine, a stubborn, manipulative donkey he could never quite master. It is one of the earliest accounts to present hiking and camping outdoors as a recreational activity. It also tells of commissioning one of the first sleeping bags, large and heavy enough to require a donkey to carry. Stevenson is several times mistaken for a peddler, the usual occupation of someone traveling in his fashion. Some locals are horrified that he would sleep outdoors and suggest it is dangerous to do so because of wolves or robbers. Stevenson provides the reader with the philosophy behind his undertaking:

Fan Kwae’ at Canton Before Treaty Days, 1825-1844, The

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Fathers and Sons

With an Introduction by Lionel Kelly, University of Reading Translated by C.J. Hogarth. 'Fathers and Sons' is one of the greatest nineteenth century Russian novels, and has long been acclaimed as Turgenev's finest work. It is a political novel set in a domestic context, with a universal theme, the generational divide between fathers and sons. Set in 1859 at the moment when the Russian autocratic state began to move hesitantly towards social and political reform, the novel explores the conflict between the liberal-minded fathers of Russian reformist sympathies and their free-thinking intellectual sons whose revolutionary ideology threatened the stability of the state. At its centre is Evgeny Bazorov, a strong-willed antagonist of all forms of social orthodoxy who proclaims himself a nihilist and believes in the need to overthrow all the institutions of the state. As the novel develops Bazarov's political ambitions become fatally meshed with emotional and private concerns, and his end is a tragic failure. The novel caused a bitter furore on its publication in 1862, and this, a year later, drove Turgenev from Russia. AUTHOR: van Turgenev (1818 -1883) was the first Russian author to achieve international fame, and is ranked with Tolstoy and Dostoevsky as the three great Russian novelists of the nineteenth century. 'Fathers and Sons' is his most enduring work.