Showing 61–90 of 213 results

Dead Souls

To the door of an inn in the provincial town of N. there drew up a smart britchka?a light spring-carriage of the sort affected by bachelors, retired lieutenant-colonels, staff-captains, land-owners possessed of about a hundred souls, and, in short, all persons who rank as gentlemen of the intermediate category. In the britchka was seated such a gentleman?a man who, though not handsome, was not ill-favoured, not over-fat, and not over-thin. Also, though not over-elderly, he was not over-young. His arrival produced no stir in the town, and was accompanied by no particular incident, beyond that a couple of peasants who happened to be standing at the door of a dramshop exchanged a few comments with reference to the equipage rather than to the individual who was seated in it. "Look at that carriage," one of them said to the other. "Think you it will be going as far as Moscow?" "I think it will," replied his companion. "But not as far as Kazan, eh?" "No, not as far as Kazan." With that the conversation ended. Presently, as the britchka was approaching the inn, it was met by a young man in a pair of very short, very tight breeches of white dimity, a quasi-fashionable frockcoat, and a dickey fastened with a pistol-shaped bronze tie-pin. The young man turned his head as he passed the britchka and eyed it attentively; after which he clapped his hand to his cap (which was in danger of being removed by the wind) and resumed his way. [...]

Discourses on Satire & Epic Poetry (Webster’s Korean Thesaurus Edition)

Websters paperbacks take advantage of the fact that classics are frequently assigned readings in English courses. By using a running English-to-Korean thesaurus at the bottom of each page, this edition of Discourses on Satire & Epic Poetry by John Dryden was edited for three audiences. The first includes Korean-speaking students enrolled in an English Language Program (ELP), an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) program, an English as a Second Language Program (ESL), or in a TOEFL or TOEIC preparation program. The second audience includes English-speaking students enrolled in bilingual education programs or Korean speakers enrolled in English-speaking schools. The third audience consists of students who are actively building their vocabularies in Korean in order to take foreign service, translation certification, Advanced Placement (AP) or similar examinations. By using the Webster's Korean Thesaurus Edition when assigned for an English course, the reader can enrich their vocabulary in anticipation of an examination in Korean or English. TOEFL, TOEIC, AP and Advanced Placement are trademarks of the Educational Testing Service which has neither reviewed nor endorsed this book. All rights reserved. Websters edition of this classic is organized to expose the reader to a maximum number of difficult and potentially ambiguous English words. Rare or idiosyncratic words and expressions are given lower priority compared to difficult, yet commonly used words. Rather than supply a single translation, many words are translated for a variety of meanings in Korean, allowing readers to better grasp the ambiguity of English, and avoid them using the notes as a pure translation crutch. Having thereader decipher a words meaning within context serves to improve vocabulary retention and understanding. Each page covers words not already highlighted on previous pages. If a d

E. F. Benson ULTIMATE COLLECTION: 30 Novels & 70+ Short Stories (Illustrated): Mapp and Lucia Series, Dodo Trilogy, the Room in the Tower, Paying Guests, the Relentless City, Historical Works, Biography of Charlotte Bronte?

The Shape of Things to Come is a work of science fiction, which speculates on future events from 1933 until the year 2106. In the book, a world state is established as the solution to humanity's problems. As a frame story, Wells This carefully crafted ebook: "E. F. Benson ULTIMATE COLLECTION: 30 Novels & 70+ Short Stories (Illustrated)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Edward Frederic Benson (1867?1940) was an English novelist, biographer, memoirist, archaeologist and short story writer, known professionally as E.F. Benson. He started his novel writing career in 1893 with the fashionably controversial Dodo, which was an instant success, and followed it with a variety of satire and romantic and supernatural melodrama. He repeated the success of Dodo, with sequels to this novel, but the greatest success came relatively late in his career with The Mapp and Lucia series consisting of six novels and two short stories. The novels feature humorous incidents in the lives of (mainly) upper-middle-class British people in the 1920s and 1930s, vying for social prestige and one-upmanship in an atmosphere of extreme cultural snobbery. Benson was also known as a writer of atmospheric, oblique, and at times humorous or satirical ghost stories. Table of Contents: Make Way For Lucia: Queen Lucia Miss Mapp Lucia in London Mapp and Lucia Lucia's Progress or The Worshipful Lucia Trouble for Lucia The Male Impersonator Desirable Residences Novels: Dodo; A Detail of the Day Dodo's Daughter or Dodo the Second Dodo Wonders David Blaize David Blaize and the Blue Door David Blaize of King's The Rubicon The Judgement Books The Vintage Mammon and Co. Scarlet and Hyssop The Relentless City The Valkyries The Angel of Pain The House of Defence The Blotting Book Daisy's Aunt Mrs.

Erewhon Revisited Twenty Years Later, Both by the Original Discoverer of the Country and by His Son

"Erewhon Revisited Twenty Years Later, Both by the Original Discoverer of the Country and by His Son" by Samuel Butler. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Erewhon; Or, Over the Range

Erewhon: or, Over the Range' is a novel by Samuel Butler which was first published anonymously in 1872. Erewhon is a fictional country in the story, which is discovered by the protagonist. Butler meant the title to be read as "nowhere" backwards even though the letters "h" and "w" are transposed, as it would have been pronounced in his day. The book is a satire on Victorian society.

Fenimore Cooper’s Literary Offences

Fenimore Cooper - author of The Deerslayer, The Last of the Mohicans, etc - has often been praised, but just as often been criticised for his writing. Mark Twain wrote a funny, vicious little essay on the subject, in which he states: "In one place in 'Deerslayer,' and in the restricted space of two-thirds of a page, Cooper has scored 114 offences against literary art out of a possible 115." (Summary by Gesine)

First Men in the Moon, The

H. G. Wells' 1901 science fiction novel The First Men in the Moon tells the story of a voyage to the moon by Mr. Bedford, a businessman plagued by financial problems, and Dr. Cavor, a brilliant and somewhat eccentric scientist. On arrival they discover that the moon is already inhabited by an advanced underground civilization of insect-like beings who they call "Selenites". This forward-looking novel, critical of the imperialism of Wells' time, looks at the clash of civilizations and suggests a reflection of how humanity might develop in the future.

Fitz-Boodle Papers (Webster’s Portuguese Thesaurus Edition), The

Websters paperbacks take advantage of the fact that classics are frequently assigned readings in English courses. By using a running English-to-Portuguese thesaurus at the bottom of each page, this edition of The Fitz-Boodle Papers by William Makepeace Thackeray was edited for three audiences. The first includes Portuguese-speaking students enrolled in an English Language Program (ELP), an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) program, an English as a Second Language Program (ESL), or in a TOEFL or TOEIC preparation program. The second audience includes English-speaking students enrolled in bilingual education programs or Portuguese speakers enrolled in English-speaking schools. The third audience consists of students who are actively building their vocabularies in Portuguese in order to take foreign service, translation certification, Advanced Placement (AP) or similar examinations. By using the Webster's Portuguese Thesaurus Edition when assigned for an English course, the reader can enrich their vocabulary in anticipation of an examination in Portuguese or English. TOEFL, TOEIC, AP and Advanced Placement are trademarks of the Educational Testing Service which has neither reviewed nor endorsed this book. All rights reserved. Websters edition of this classic is organized to expose the reader to a maximum number of difficult and potentially ambiguous English words. Rare or idiosyncratic words and expressions are given lower priority compared to difficult, yet commonly used words. Rather than supply a single translation, many words are translated for a variety of meanings in Portuguese, allowing readers to better grasp the ambiguity of English, and avoid them using the notes as a puretranslation crutch. Having the reader decipher a words meaning within context serves to improve vocabulary retention and understanding. Each page covers words not already highl

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Illustrated Edition)

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions is a satirical novel. Written pseudonymously by "A Square", the book used the fictional two-dimensional world of Flatland to comment on the hierarchy of Victorian culture, but the novella's more enduring contribution is its examination of dimensions. The story describes a two-dimensional world occupied by geometric figures, whereof women are simple line-segments, while men are polygons with various numbers of sides. The narrator is a square named A Square, a member of the caste of gentlemen and professionals, who guides the readers through some of the implications of life in two dimensions. Flatland has often been categorized as science fiction although it could more precisely be called "mathematical fiction". With the advent of modern science fiction from the 1950s to the present day, Flatland has seen a revival in popularity, especially among science fiction and cyberpunk fans. Many works have been inspired by the novella, including novel sequels and short films.

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Illustrated Edition)

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions is a satirical novel. Written pseudonymously by "A Square", the book used the fictional two-dimensional world of Flatland to comment on the hierarchy of Victorian culture, but the novella's more enduring contribution is its examination of dimensions. The story describes a two-dimensional world occupied by geometric figures, whereof women are simple line-segments, while men are polygons with various numbers of sides. The narrator is a square named A Square, a member of the caste of gentlemen and professionals, who guides the readers through some of the implications of life in two dimensions. Flatland has often been categorized as science fiction although it could more precisely be called "mathematical fiction". With the advent of modern science fiction from the 1950s to the present day, Flatland has seen a revival in popularity, especially among science fiction and cyberpunk fans. Many works have been inspired by the novella, including novel sequels and short films.

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Illustrated Edition)

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions is a satirical novel. Written pseudonymously by "A Square", the book used the fictional two-dimensional world of Flatland to comment on the hierarchy of Victorian culture, but the novella's more enduring contribution is its examination of dimensions. The story describes a two-dimensional world occupied by geometric figures, whereof women are simple line-segments, while men are polygons with various numbers of sides. The narrator is a square named A Square, a member of the caste of gentlemen and professionals, who guides the readers through some of the implications of life in two dimensions. Flatland has often been categorized as science fiction although it could more precisely be called "mathematical fiction". With the advent of modern science fiction from the 1950s to the present day, Flatland has seen a revival in popularity, especially among science fiction and cyberpunk fans. Many works have been inspired by the novella, including novel sequels and short films.

Gilded Age: A Tale of Today, The

The term gilded age, commonly given to the era, comes from the title of this book. Twain and Warner got the name from Shakespeare's King John (1595): "To gild refined gold, to paint the lily... is wasteful and ridiculous excess." (Act IV, scene 2) Gilding gold, which would be to put gold on top of gold, is excessive and wasteful, characteristics of the age Twain and Warner wrote about in their novel. Another interpretation of the title, of course, is the contrast between an ideal "Golden Age" and a less worthy "Gilded Age", as gilding is only a thin layer of gold over baser metal, so the title now takes on a pejorative meaning as to the novel's time, events and people.The novel concerns the efforts of a poor rural family to become affluent by selling in a timely manner the 75,000 acres (300 km2) of unimproved land acquired by their patriarch, Silas "Si" Hawkins. After several adventures in Tennessee, the family fails to sell the land and Si Hawkins dies. The rest of the Hawkins story line focuses on their beautiful adopted daughter Laura. In the early 1870s, she travels to Washington, D.C. to become a lobbyist. With a senator's help, she enters society and attempts to persuade congressmen to require the federal government to purchase the land.A parallel story written by Warner concerns two young upperclass men, Philip Sterling and Henry Brierly, who seek their fortunes in land in a novel way. They make a journey with a group intent on surveying land in Tennessee in order to acquire it for speculation. Philip is good-natured but plodding. He is in love with Ruth Bolton, an aspiring physician and feminist. Henry is a born salesman, charming but superficial.The theme of the novel is that the lust for getting rich through land speculation pervades society, illustrated by the Hawkinses as well as Ruth's well-educated father, who nevertheless cannot resist becoming enmeshed in self-evidently dubious money-making schemes.The Hawkins sections, including several humorous sketches, were written by Twain. Examples are the steamboat race that leads to a wreck (Chapter IV) and Laura's toying with a clerk in a Washington bookstore (Chapter XXXVI). Notable too is the comic presence throughout the book of the eternally optimistic and eternally broke Colonel Beriah Sellers, a Micawber-like character. The character was named Escol Sellers in the first edition and changed to Beriah when an actual George Escol Sellers of Philadelphia objected. A real Beriah Sellers then turned up, causing Twain to use the name Mulberry Sellers in The American Claimant. The Sellers character was modeled after James Lampton, Twain's maternal cousin, and the land-purchase plot parallels Twain's father's purchase of a Tennessee parcel whose prospective sale, Twain wrote in his autobiography "kept us hoping and hoping, during 40 years, and forsook us at last."The main action of the story takes place in Washington, D.C., and satirizes the greed and corruption of the governing class. Twain also satirizes the social pretensions of the newly rich. Laura's Washington visitors include "Mrs. Patrique Oreille (pronounced O-relay)", the wife of "a wealthy Frenchman from Cork", indicating the O'Reilly family has altered their last name to hide their Irish origins.

Ginx’s Baby: His Birth and Other Misfortunes; A Satire

"Ginx's Baby: His Birth and Other Misfortunes; a Satire" by Edward Jenkins. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.