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Benjamin Franklin

"Benjamin Franklin" by Paul Elmer More. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Cicero: Brutus and Orator

"These translations of the Brutus and Orator were conceived as a sequel to the excellent translation of the De oratore by James May and Jaap Wisse, also published by Oxford University Press (Cicero: On the Ideal Orator, Oxford 2001). The book's raison d'?etre is easily stated. No new, complete, and readily available English versions of the two texts have appeared since the Loeb Classical Library edition was published in 1939, with translations by G. L. Hendrickson and H. M. Hubbell. Though both translations are accurate and still readable (Hendrickson's, in fact, is excellent), the introductions to the two works are brief and insufficient, and the annotation (in the manner of older Loebs) is still less adequate. Furthermore, our understanding of Cicero and the late Roman Republic has changed significantly in the eighty years since the Loeb appeared, and the resources available to students of the Brutus, in particular, are much more ample. I have reason to hope, therefore, that this book will be of some use. There is no need to discuss here the overall plan of the book, which the table of contents makes clear, or the approach taken to the translation and annotation, addressed in Introduction par. 5. The annotation very likely provides more detail than some readers will require, but I thought it best to err on the side of inclusion and leave it to readers to ignore-as readers can be relied on to do-material that does not speak to their needs or interests. I should add two notes. First, because Brutus and Orator are the most important sources for our understanding of Roman "Atticism" (Introduction par. 3), I have included in Appendix A a translation of the third Ciceronian text that bears on that subject, On the Best Kind of Orator (De optimo genere oratorum), a brief fragment that Cicero wrote but abandoned in the interval between the composition of Brutus and Orator in 46 BCE. Second, for the fragmentary remains of orators other than Cicero I have retained references to the fourth edition of Enrica Malcovati's Oratorum Romanorum Fragments (e.g., "ORF4 no. 8 fr. 149"), despite the fact that its successor, Fragments of the Roman Republican Orators (FRRO)-the work of a team led by Catherine Steel-will soon appear. The orators in FRRO will not be numbered and ordered chronologically, as they are in ORF4, but will be organized alphabetically by clan name for ready location, and a set of concordances will facilitate movment back and forth between the two editions",

Cicero: Brutus and Orator

"These translations of the Brutus and Orator were conceived as a sequel to the excellent translation of the De oratore by James May and Jaap Wisse, also published by Oxford University Press (Cicero: On the Ideal Orator, Oxford 2001). The book's raison d'?etre is easily stated. No new, complete, and readily available English versions of the two texts have appeared since the Loeb Classical Library edition was published in 1939, with translations by G. L. Hendrickson and H. M. Hubbell. Though both translations are accurate and still readable (Hendrickson's, in fact, is excellent), the introductions to the two works are brief and insufficient, and the annotation (in the manner of older Loebs) is still less adequate. Furthermore, our understanding of Cicero and the late Roman Republic has changed significantly in the eighty years since the Loeb appeared, and the resources available to students of the Brutus, in particular, are much more ample. I have reason to hope, therefore, that this book will be of some use. There is no need to discuss here the overall plan of the book, which the table of contents makes clear, or the approach taken to the translation and annotation, addressed in Introduction par. 5. The annotation very likely provides more detail than some readers will require, but I thought it best to err on the side of inclusion and leave it to readers to ignore-as readers can be relied on to do-material that does not speak to their needs or interests. I should add two notes. First, because Brutus and Orator are the most important sources for our understanding of Roman "Atticism" (Introduction par. 3), I have included in Appendix A a translation of the third Ciceronian text that bears on that subject, On the Best Kind of Orator (De optimo genere oratorum), a brief fragment that Cicero wrote but abandoned in the interval between the composition of Brutus and Orator in 46 BCE. Second, for the fragmentary remains of orators other than Cicero I have retained references to the fourth edition of Enrica Malcovati's Oratorum Romanorum Fragments (e.g., "ORF4 no. 8 fr. 149"), despite the fact that its successor, Fragments of the Roman Republican Orators (FRRO)-the work of a team led by Catherine Steel-will soon appear. The orators in FRRO will not be numbered and ordered chronologically, as they are in ORF4, but will be organized alphabetically by clan name for ready location, and a set of concordances will facilitate movment back and forth between the two editions",

Cicero: Brutus and Orator

"These translations of the Brutus and Orator were conceived as a sequel to the excellent translation of the De oratore by James May and Jaap Wisse, also published by Oxford University Press (Cicero: On the Ideal Orator, Oxford 2001). The book's raison d'?etre is easily stated. No new, complete, and readily available English versions of the two texts have appeared since the Loeb Classical Library edition was published in 1939, with translations by G. L. Hendrickson and H. M. Hubbell. Though both translations are accurate and still readable (Hendrickson's, in fact, is excellent), the introductions to the two works are brief and insufficient, and the annotation (in the manner of older Loebs) is still less adequate. Furthermore, our understanding of Cicero and the late Roman Republic has changed significantly in the eighty years since the Loeb appeared, and the resources available to students of the Brutus, in particular, are much more ample. I have reason to hope, therefore, that this book will be of some use. There is no need to discuss here the overall plan of the book, which the table of contents makes clear, or the approach taken to the translation and annotation, addressed in Introduction par. 5. The annotation very likely provides more detail than some readers will require, but I thought it best to err on the side of inclusion and leave it to readers to ignore-as readers can be relied on to do-material that does not speak to their needs or interests. I should add two notes. First, because Brutus and Orator are the most important sources for our understanding of Roman "Atticism" (Introduction par. 3), I have included in Appendix A a translation of the third Ciceronian text that bears on that subject, On the Best Kind of Orator (De optimo genere oratorum), a brief fragment that Cicero wrote but abandoned in the interval between the composition of Brutus and Orator in 46 BCE. Second, for the fragmentary remains of orators other than Cicero I have retained references to the fourth edition of Enrica Malcovati's Oratorum Romanorum Fragments (e.g., "ORF4 no. 8 fr. 149"), despite the fact that its successor, Fragments of the Roman Republican Orators (FRRO)-the work of a team led by Catherine Steel-will soon appear. The orators in FRRO will not be numbered and ordered chronologically, as they are in ORF4, but will be organized alphabetically by clan name for ready location, and a set of concordances will facilitate movment back and forth between the two editions",

Letters of Marcus Tullius Cicero With His Treatises on Friendship and Old Age: Letters of Pliny the Younger

Translator names not noted above: E.S. Shuckburgh, William Melmoth, F.C.T. Bosanquet Originally published between 1909 and 1917 under the name "Harvard Classics," this stupendous 51-volume set-a collection of the greatest writings from literature, philosophy, history, and mythology-was assembled by American academic CHARLES WILLIAM ELIOT (1834-1926), Harvard University's longest-serving president. Also known as "Dr. Eliot's Five Foot Shelf," it represented Eliot's belief that a basic liberal education could be gleaned by reading from an anthology of works that could fit on five feet of bookshelf. Volume IX features: [ three works by Roman philosopher MARCUS TULLIUS CICERO (106 Bi43 Be: the dialogue On Friendship, a timeless consideration of that happy state; the essay On Old Age, his reflections on aging and death; and his Letters, including his thoughts on matters both personal and political [ the Letters of Roman lawyer PLINY THE YOUNGER (61-c. 112), which remain some of the most valuable firsthand documents we have of the period, particularly since he moved in politically important circles; the letters include his eyewitness account of the disastrous eruption of Mount Vesuvius.