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A Book of Sibyls: Miss Barbauld, Miss Edgeworth, Mrs Opie, Miss Austen

"A Book of Sibyls: Miss Barbauld, Miss Edgeworth, Mrs Opie, Miss Austen" by Anne Thackeray Ritchie. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Claire D’Albe: An English Translation

Both Claire and her husband, M. d'Albe, are virtuous and upstanding, and Fr?d?ric, her husband's nineteen-year-old adopted son and factory assistant, is honest and noble-hearted. But in the beautiful and secluded Loire Valley, the friendship between Claire and Fr?d?ric gradually develops into a forbidden passion.Claire d'Albe (1799) was audacious in its day for its representation of adulterous love as a positive act of self-fulfillment. As the volume editor, Margaret Cohen, indicates, Sophie Cottin's best-selling work of sentimentalism highlights the tension in Enlightenment liberalism between collective welfare and personal happiness. Although such later French authors as Stendhal and Balzac denigrated sentimentalism along with female novelists, Claire d'Albe influenced their realist aesthetics.

Dawn O’Hara, the Girl Who Laughed (Webster’s Japanese Thesaurus Edition)

This edition is written in English. However, there is a running Japanese thesaurus at the bottom of each page for the more difficult English words highlighted in the text. There are many editions of Dawn O'Hara, The Girl Who Laughed. This edition would be useful if you would like to enrich your Japanese-English vocabulary, whether for self-improvement or for preparation in advanced of college examinations. Webster's edition of this classic is organized to expose the reader to a maximum number of difficult and potentially ambiguous English words. Rare or idiosyncratic words and expressions are given lower priority compared to "difficult, yet commonly used" English words. Rather than supply a single translation, many words are translated for a variety of meanings in Japanese, allowing readers to better grasp the ambiguity of English without using the notes as a pure translation crutch. Having the reader decipher a word's meaning within context serves to improve vocabulary retention and understanding. Each page covers words not already highlighted on previous pages. This edition is helpful to Japanese-speaking students enrolled in an English Language Program (ELP), an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) program, an English as a Second Language Program (ESL), or in a TOEFL or TOEIC preparation program. Students who are actively building their vocabularies in Japanese or English may also find this useful for Advanced Placement (AP ) tests. TOEFL, TOEIC, AP and Advanced Placement are trademarks of the Educational Testing Service which has neither reviewed nor endorsed this book. This book is one of a series of Webster's paperbacks that allows the reader to obtain more value from the experience of reading. Translations are from Webster's Online Dictionary, derived from a meta-analysis of public sources, cited on the site.

Diaries of Court Ladies of Old Japan

Mary Mark Ockerbloom provides the full text of the 1920 translation of "Diaries of Court Ladies of Old Japan," as part of the Celebration of Women Writers project. Annie Shepley Omori and Kochi Doi translated the diaries, reputedly written by Japanese women during the 10th and 11th centuries.

Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus (The Revised 1831 Edition – Wisehouse Classics) (Revised 1831)

This is the Revised 1831 Edition of FRANKENSTEIN; OR, THE MODERN PROMETHEUS, a novel written by the English author Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley about the young science student Victor Frankenstein, who creates a grotesque but sentient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Shelley started writing the story when she was eighteen, and the novel was published when she was twenty. The first edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley's name appears on the second edition, published in France in 1823. Shelley had travelled through Europe in 1814, journeying along the river Rhine in Germany with a stop in Gernsheim which is just 17 km away from Frankenstein Castle, where, two centuries before, an alchemist was engaged in experiments. Later, she travelled in the region of Geneva (Switzerland)-where much of the story takes place-and the topic of galvanism and other similar occult ideas were themes of conversation among her companions, particularly her lover and future husband, Percy Shelley. Mary, Percy, Lord Byron, and John Polidori decided to have a competition to see who could write the best horror story. After thinking for days, Shelley dreamt about a scientist who created life and was horrified by what he had made; her dream later evolved into the novel's story. Shelley completed her writing in May 1817, and Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus was first published on 11 March 1818 by the small London publishing house of Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor, & Jones. The second edition of Frankenstein was published on 11 August 1822 in two volumes (by G. and W. B. Whittaker) following the success of the stage play Presumption; or, the Fate of Frankenstein by Richard Brinsley Peake; this edition credited Mary Shelley as the author. On 31 October 1831, the first "popular" edition in one volume appeared, published by Henry Colburn & Richard Bentley. This edition was heavily revised by Mary Shelley, partially because of pressure to make the story more conservative, and included a new, longer preface by her, presenting a somewhat embellished version of the genesis of the story. This edition tends to be the one most widely read now, although editions containing the original 1818 text are still published. Many scholars prefer the 1818 text, arguing that it preserves the spirit of Shelley's original publication.

Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus (The Revised 1831 Edition – Wisehouse Classics) (Revised 1831)

This is the Revised 1831 Edition of FRANKENSTEIN; OR, THE MODERN PROMETHEUS, a novel written by the English author Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley about the young science student Victor Frankenstein, who creates a grotesque but sentient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Shelley started writing the story when she was eighteen, and the novel was published when she was twenty. The first edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley's name appears on the second edition, published in France in 1823. Shelley had travelled through Europe in 1814, journeying along the river Rhine in Germany with a stop in Gernsheim which is just 17 km away from Frankenstein Castle, where, two centuries before, an alchemist was engaged in experiments. Later, she travelled in the region of Geneva (Switzerland)-where much of the story takes place-and the topic of galvanism and other similar occult ideas were themes of conversation among her companions, particularly her lover and future husband, Percy Shelley. Mary, Percy, Lord Byron, and John Polidori decided to have a competition to see who could write the best horror story. After thinking for days, Shelley dreamt about a scientist who created life and was horrified by what he had made; her dream later evolved into the novel's story. Shelley completed her writing in May 1817, and Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus was first published on 11 March 1818 by the small London publishing house of Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor, & Jones. The second edition of Frankenstein was published on 11 August 1822 in two volumes (by G. and W. B. Whittaker) following the success of the stage play Presumption; or, the Fate of Frankenstein by Richard Brinsley Peake; this edition credited Mary Shelley as the author. On 31 October 1831, the first "popular" edition in one volume appeared, published by Henry Colburn & Richard Bentley. This edition was heavily revised by Mary Shelley, partially because of pressure to make the story more conservative, and included a new, longer preface by her, presenting a somewhat embellished version of the genesis of the story. This edition tends to be the one most widely read now, although editions containing the original 1818 text are still published. Many scholars prefer the 1818 text, arguing that it preserves the spirit of Shelley's original publication.

Greville Fane

"Greville Fane" by Henry James. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Hagar

Reproduction of the original: Hagar by Mary Johnston

I, Mary MacLane: A Diary of Human Days

"I, Mary MacLane: A Diary of Human Days" by Mary MacLane. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

In This Our World

This book contains Charlotte Perkins Gilman's first collection of poetry, coupled with almost eighty previously uncollected pieces. A wonderful compendium that is sure to be of interest to keen lovers of poetry, 'In This Our World' is a great example of Gilman's unique style and unrelenting passion for her subject matter. A book worthy of a place atop any bookshelf, this text constitutes a veritable must-have for fans and collectors of Gilman's prolific work. The poems contained herein include: 'Birth', 'Nature's Answer', 'The Commonplace',' A Common Inference', 'The Rock and the Sea', 'The Lion Path', 'Reinforcements', 'Heroism', 'Fire with Fire', 'The Shield', and many, many more. Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860 - 1935) was an influential American sociologist, feminist, academic-lecturer, novelist and poet. We are proud to republish this antique book, complete with a new biography of the author.

Joan of the Journal

This scarce antiquarian book is a selection from Kessinger Publishings Legacy Reprint Series. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving, and promoting the worlds literature. Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of rare and hard-to-find books with something of interest for everyone!

Kansas Women in Literature

"Kansas Women in Literature" by Nettie Garmer Barker. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Maria Edgeworth – Murad the Unlucky & Other Tales: ‘Justice Satisfies Everybody”

Maria Edgeworth was born at Black Bourton, Oxfordshire on January 1st 1768. Her early years were with her mother's family in England. Sadly, her mother died when Maria was five. Maria was educated at Mrs Lattafi?re's school in Derby in 1775. There she studied dancing, French and other subjects. Maria transferred to Mrs Devis's school in Upper Wimpole Street, London. Her father began to focus more attention on Maria in 1781 when she nearly lost her sight to an eye infection. She returned home to Ireland at 14 and took charge of her younger siblings. She herself was home-tutored by her father in Irish economics and politics, science, literature and law. Despite her youth literature was in her blood. Maria also became her father's assistant in managing the family's large Edgeworthstown estate. Maria first published 1795 with 'Letters for Literary Ladies'. That same year 'An Essay on the Noble Science of Self-Justification', written for a female audience, advised women on how to obtain better rights in general and specifically from their husbands. 'Practical Education' (1798) is a progressive work on education. Maria's ambition was to create an independent thinker who understands the consequences of his or her actions. Her first novel, 'Castle Rackrent' was published anonymously in 1800 without her father's knowledge. It was an immediate success and firmly established Maria's appeal to the public. Her father married four times and the last of these to Frances, a year younger and a confidante of Maria, who pushed them to travel more widely: London, Britain and Europe were all now visited. The second series of 'Tales of Fashionable Life' (1812) did so well that she was now the most commercially successful novelist of her age. She particularly worked hard to improve the living standards of the poor in Edgeworthstown and to provide schools for the local children of all and any denomination. After a visit to see her relations Maria had severe chest pains and died suddenly of a heart attack in Edgeworthstown on 22nd May 1849. She was 81.

Monsieur V?nus: A Materialist Novel

When the rich and well-connected Raoule de V?n?rande becomes enamored of Jacques Silvert, a poor young man who makes artificial flowers for a living, she turns him into her mistress and eventually into her wife. Raoule's suitor, a cigar-smoking former hussar officer, becomes an accomplice in the complications that ensue.

Orchard and Vineyard

ESCAPECOME, shall we go, my comrade, from this denWhere falsehood reigns and we have dallied long?Exchange the curious vanities of menFor roads of freedom and for ships of song? We came as strangers, came to learn and look,To hear their music, drink the wine they gave.Now let us hence again; the happy brookShall quench our thirst, our music be the wave. Come! they are feasting, let us steal away.Beyond the doors the night awaits us, sweet.To-morrow we shall see the break of day,And goat-herds? pipes shall lead our roaming feet. TO EVE IN TEARSYOU laughed, and all the fountains of the EastLeapt up to Heaven with their diamond rainTo hang in light, and when your laughter ceasedDropped shivered arrows to the ground again. You laughed, and from the belfries of the earthThe music rippled like a shaken pool;And listless banners at the breeze of mirthWere stirred in harbours suddenly made cool. You wept, and all the music of the air?As when a hand is laid upon a bell?Was stilled, and Dryads of the tossing hairCrept back abashed within the secret dell. MARIANA IN THE NORTHALL her youth is gone, her beautiful youth outworn,Daughter of tarn and tor, the moors that were once her homeNo longer know her step on the upland tracks forlornWhere she was wont to roam. All her hounds are dead, her beautiful hounds are dead,That paced beside the hoofs of her high and nimble horse,Or streaked in lean pursuit of the tawny hare that fledOut of the yellow gorse. All her lovers have passed, her beautiful lovers have passed,The young and eager men that fought for her arrogant hand,And the only voice which endures to mourn for her at the lastIs the voice of the lonely land. SORROW OF DEPARTURE. For D.HE sat among the shadows lost,And heard the careless voice speak onOf life when he was gone from home,Of days that he had made his own,Familiar schemes that he had known,And dates that he had cherished mostAs star-points in the year to come,And he was suddenly alone,Thinking (not bitterly,But with a grave regret) that heWas in that room a ghost. He sat among the shades apart,The careless voice he scarcely heard.In that arrested hour there stirredShy birds of beauty in his heart. The clouds of March he would not seeAcross the sky race royally,Nor yet the drift of daffodilHe planted with so glad a hand,Nor yet the loveliness he plannedFor summer?s sequence to fulfil,Nor trace upon the hillThe annual waking of the land,Nor meditative standTo watch the turning of the mill. He would not pause above the WealdWith twilight falling dim,And mark the chequer-board of field,The water gleaming like a shield,The oast-house in the elms concealed,Nor see, from heaven?s chalice-rim,The vintaged sunset brim,Nor yet the high, suspended starHanging eternally afar. These things would be, but not for him. At summer noon he would not lieOne with his cutter?s rise and dip,Free with the wind and sea and sky,And watch the dappled waves go by,The sea-gulls scream and slip;White sails, white birds, white clouds, white foam,White cliffs that curled the love of homeAround him like a whip....He would not see that summer noonFade into dusk from light,While he on shifting waters brightSailed idly on, beneath the moonClimbing the dome of night. This was his dream of happy thingsThat he had loved through many springs, And never more might know.But man must pass the shrouded gateCompanioned by his secret fate,And he must lonely go,And none can help or understand,For other men may touch his hand,But none the soul below.

Poems

Kathleen Mansfield Murry (nee Beauchamp, 1888-1923) was a prominent New Zealand modernist short story writer and poet who was born and brought up in colonial New Zealand and wrote under the pen name Katherine Mansfield. Aged 19, she first visited England where she eventually settled, falling into a bohemian way of life and becoming friends with writers such as D H Lawrence and Virginia Woolf. She also travelled in continental Europe and her experiences in Germany inspired her first published collection of stories, In a German Pension (1911). In that year she entered into a relationship with John Middleton Murry, a writer and magazine editor, and the couple eventually married in 1918 although they often lived apart. In late 1917 she was diagnosed with tuberculosis and she became a prolific writer in the last years of her life, publishing two further story collections in 1920 and 1922, with much of her work remaining unpublished at the time of her death in 1923. This collection of her poems was published posthumously that year with a brief introductory note by Murry.

Songs of Love and Empire

"Songs of Love and Empire" is a 1898 collection of poetry by E. Nesbit. Edith Nesbit (1858 ? 1924) was an English poet and author. She is perhaps best remembered for her children's literature, publishing more than 60 such books under the name E. Nesbit. She was also a political activist and co-founded the Fabian Society, which had a significant influence on the Labour Party and British politics in general. This wonderful collection of her best poetry will appeal to fans of her work and would make for a fantastic addition to any bookshelf. The poems include: ?To The Queen of England?, ?After Sixty Years?, ?Trafalgar Day?, ?A Song of Trafalgar?, ?Waterloo Day?, ?A Song of Peace and Honour?, ?The Ballad of the White Lady?, ?The Ghost Bereft?, ?The Vain Spell?, ?The Adventurer?, ?In The Enchanted Tower?, ?Faith?, ?Prelude?, ?At the Sound of the Drum?, ?The Goose-Girl?, and more. Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. It is with this in mind that we are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially-commissioned new biography of the author.

Sonnets From the Portuguese and Other Poems

Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), English poet and wife of the poet Robert Browning, is perhaps best known for her remarkable series of 44 love poems "Sonnets from the Portuguese." Published in 1850, they were written by Mrs. Browning to her husband during the early years of their relationship. Their obvious sincerity, gentleness and passion and the devotion and gratitude they express have made the poems popular favorites with generations of readers.

Suffrage Songs and Verses

Gilman (1860-1935) was a prominent American feminist, sociologist, novelist, writer of short stories, poetry and non-fiction, and a lecturer for social reform. Her best remembered work is the semi-autobiographical story 'The Yellow Wallpaper' (1892) which she wrote after a severe bout of postpartum psychosis. This collection of songs and verses were first published together in book form in 1911.

The Country of the Pointed Firs

The Life Uncovered in A Lonely, Hard Fishing Village.. The Country of the Pointed Firs is an 1896 short story sequence by Sarah Orne Jewett which is considered by some literary critics to be her finest work. Henry James described it as her ""beautiful little quantum of achievement."" Ursula K. Le Guin praises its ""quietly powerful rhythms."" Because it is loosely structured, many critics view the book not as a novel, but a series of sketches; however, its structure is unified through both setting and theme. The novel can be read as a study of the effects of isolation and hardship experienced by the inhabitants of the decaying fishing villages along the Maine coast. Sarah Orne Jewett, who wrote the book when she was 47, was largely responsible for popularizing the regionalism genre with her sketches of the fictional Maine fishing village of Dunnet Landing. Like Jewett, the narrator is a woman, a writer, unattached, genteel in demeanor, feisty and zealously protective of her time to write.

The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World and Other Writings

Her poems, her plays, her philosophies, her orations, her discourses. All these folios and quartos in which, she protested, her real life was enshrined. Moulder in the gloom of public libraries, or are decanted into tiny thimbles which hold sex drops of profusion. ,Virginia Woolf, writing about Margaret CavendishIn light of recent critical interest in Utopian and futuristic writing, as well as historical figures in women's literary works, the reissue of the Description ofThe New Blazing World, first published in 1666 and one of the earliest examples of science fiction writing, is essential. It tells the story of a voyage to another work of speculative science in which women effortlessly rise to absolute power and sexual roles blur. Cavendish, as a character in the fantasy herself, emerges as an ironically self designated hermaphroditic spectacle who dramatizes a heroic figure of woman, ingeniously turning patriarchalized scenes of power and seduction to her own benefit. Dismissed by Pepsys as mad, conceited, and ridiculous, Cavendish lived a life devoted to excess, and the number of elaborately produced books she wrote and published at her own expense during her twenty year career became her most radical and deliberate break from contemporary social etiquette.

The Learned Lady in England, 1650-1760

"The Learned Lady in England, 1650-1760" by Myra Reynolds. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.