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Alcibiades I/ Alcibiades Ii

The First Alcibiades or is a dialogue featuring Alcibiades in conversation with Socrates. It is ascribed to Plato, The Second Alcibiades has Socrates attempting to persuade Alcibiades that it is unsafe for him to pray to the gods if he does not know whether what he prays for is actually good or bad, In the preface Alcibiades is described as an ambitious young man who is eager to enter public life. He is extremely proud of his good looks, noble birth, many friends, possessions and his connection to Pericles, the leader of the Athenian state. Alcibiades has many admirers but they have all run away, afraid of his coldness. Socrates was the first of his admirers but he has not spoken to him for many years. Now the older man tries to help the youth with his questions before Alcibiades presents himself in front of the Athenian assembly. For the rest of the dialogue Socrates explains the many reasons why Alcibiades needs him. By the end of Alcibiades I, the youth is much persuaded by Socrates' reasoning, and accepts him as his mentor.The first topic they enter is the essence of politics - war and peace. Socrates claims that people should fight on just grounds, but he doubts that Alcibiades has any knowledge about justice. Prodded by Socrates' questioning, Alcibiades admits that he has never learned the nature of justice from a master nor has discovered it by himself.Alcibiades suggests that politics is not about justice but expediency and the two principles could be opposed. Socrates persuades him that he is mistaken, and there is no expediency without justice. The humiliated youth concedes that he knows nothing about politics.Later Alcibiades says that he is not concerned about his ignorance because all the other Athenian politicians are ignorant. Socrates reminds him that his true rivals are the kings of Sparta and Persia. He delivers a long lecture about the careful education, glorious might and unparalleled richness of these foreign rulers. Alcibiades gets cold feet which was exactly the purpose of Socrates' speech.After this interlude the dialogue proceeds with further questioning about the rules of society. Socrates points to the many contradictions in Alcibiades' thoughts. Later they agree that man has to follow the advice of the famous Delphic phrase: gn?thi seaut?n meaning know thyself. They discuss that the "ruling principle" of man is not the body but the soul. Somebody's true lover loves his soul, while the lover of the body flies as soon as the youth fades. With this Socrates proves that he is the only true lover of Alcibiades. "From this day forward, I must and will follow you as you have followed me; I will be the disciple, and you shall be my master", proclaims the youth. Together they will work on to improve Alcibiades' character because only the virtuous has the right to govern. Tyrannical power should not be the aim of individuals but people accept to be commanded by a superior.

All of Grace

HE WHO SPOKE and wrote this message will be greatly disappointed if it does not lead many to the Lord Jesus. It is sent forth in childlike dependence upon the power of God the Holy Ghost, to use it in the conversion of millions, if so He pleases. No doubt many poor men and women will take up this little volume, and the Lord will visit them with grace. To answer this end, the very plainest language has been chosen, and many homely expressions have been used. But if those of wealth and rank should glance at this book, the Holy Ghost can impress them also; since that which can be understood by the unlettered is none the less attractive to the instructed. Oh that some might read it who will become great winners of souls! Who knows how many will find their way to peace by what they read here? A more important question to you, dear reader, is this ? Will you be one of them? (From All of Grace)

All Things Are Possible

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

American Philosophy Collection Vol. 2

This recording is the second in an ongoing series of collections highlighting foundational articles in early 20th Century American philosophy. Volume 2 focuses on the debates surrounding the emergence of the so-called 'New Realism.' Inspired by the early works of the American pragmatists, the new realists opposed idealistic and transcendental metaphysics, and advocated for various forms of empirical and scientific naturalism. (summary by P. J. Taylor) Track List: 01 - The Program and Platform of the Six Realists by Edwin B. Holt, Walter T. Marvin, W. P. Montague, Ralph Barton Perry, Walter B.Pitkin and Edward Gleason Spaulding 02 - The Egocentric Predicament by R. B. Perry 03 - Brief Studies in Realism I by John Dewey 04 - Brief Studies in Realism II by John Dewey 05 - The Inadequacy of ?Natural? Realism by Durant Drake 06 - Reflections of a Temporalist on the New Realism by A. O. Lovejoy 07 - Report of the Committee on Definitions of the American Philosophical Association by F. J. E. Woodbridge, Frank Thilly, Dickinson S. Miller, Arthur O. Lovejoy, W. P. Montague, and E. G. Spaulding 08 - The Relation of Consciousness to Object in Sense Perception by E. B. McGilvary 09 - The Relation of Consciousness to Object in Sense Perception by Frank Thilly 10 - Consciousness and Object by W. J. E. Woodbridge 11 - The New Realism by Morris Raphael Cohen

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Law

In An Introduction to the Philosophy of Law, Roscoe Pound shows how philosophy has been a powerful instrument throughout the history of law. He examines what philosophy has done for some of the chief problems of the science of law and how it is possible to look at those problems philosophically without treating them in terms of a particular time period. The function of legal philosophy, writes Pound, is to rationally formulate a general theory of law which conforms to the interests, the general security first and foremost, of society. Marshall DeRosa writes in his new introduction that in the light of twentieth-century judicial politics, Roscoe Pound's philosophy of law has prevailed to a significant extent. This book's relevance to appreciating the development of the American legal system in all its complexities - including liability law, contract law, and property law - is in itself notable. But, in terms of understanding the twentieth-century development of the American rule of law, An Introduction to the Philosophy of Law is indispensable. It will make an invaluable addition to the personal libraries of legal theorists, philosophers, political scientists, and historians of American law.

An Introduction to Yoga

These lectures are intended to give an outline of Yoga, in order to prepare the student to take up, for practical purposes, the Yoga sutras of Patanjali, the chief treatise on Yoga. I have on hand, with my friend Bhagavan Das as collaborator, a translation of these Sutras, with Vyasa's commentary, and a further commentary and elucidation written in the light of Theosophy. To prepare the student for the mastering of that more difficult task, these lectures were designed; hence the many references to Patanjali. They may, however, also serve to give to the ordinary lay reader some idea of the Science of sciences, and perhaps to allure a few towards its study.

Anton Tchekhov, and Other Essays

"Anton Tchekhov, and Other Essays" by Lev Shestov (translated by John Middleton Murry, S. S. Koteliansky). Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Apology

Apology is Plato's version of the speech given by Socrates as he defended himself in 399 BC against the charges of "corrupting the young, and by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel." Socrates begins by telling the jury that their minds were poisoned by his enemies when they were young and impressionable. He says his reputation for sophistry comes from his enemies, all of whom are envious of him, and malicious. He says they must remain nameless, except for Aristophanes, the comic poet. He later answers the charge that he has corrupted the young by arguing that deliberate corruption is an incoherent idea. Socrates says that all these false accusations began with his obedience to the oracle at Delphi. He tells how Chaerephon went to the Oracle at Delphi, to ask if anyone was wiser than Socrates. When Chaerephon reported to Socrates that the god told him there is none wiser, Socrates took this as a riddle. He himself knew that he had no wisdom "great or small" but that he also knew that it is against the nature of the gods to lie. Socrates then went on a "divine mission" to solve the paradox (that an ignorant man could also be the wisest of all men) and to clarify the meaning of the Oracles' words. He systematically interrogated the politicians, poets and craftsmen. Socrates determined that the politicians were imposters, and the poets did not understand even their own poetry, like prophets and seers who do not understand what they say. Craftsmen proved to be pretentious too, and Socrates says that he saw himself as a spokesman for the oracle (23e). He asked himself whether he would rather be an impostor like the people he spoke to, or be himself. Socrates tells the jury that he would rather be himself than anyone else.

Arabic Thought and Its Place in History

Well-documented study of the mutual influence of Arabic and Western worlds during the Middle Ages traces the transmission of Greek philosophy and science to the Islamic cultures. A fascinating portrait of medieval Muslim thought, it illustrates commonalities with Judaic and Christian teachings as well as points of divergence.

Aristotle

A. E. Taylor's Aristotle is a brilliantly written popular account of the great Greek philosopher and his thought. It is not simply a listing and abstract discussion of ideas, but a searching analysis of Aristotle's thought, both in terms of its contemporary and historical background, and its present application. Written by one of the very greatest Platonic scholars of our day, it is provocative enough to stimulate the expert, and lucid and instructive for the beginner.Dr. Taylor covers the life and works of Aristotle; classification of the sciences; scientific method; formal logic; induction; theory of knowledge; first philosophy; matter & form; the potential and the actual; the four causes; motion and its eternity; God; physics; terrestrial bodies; biology; psychology; grades of psychical life; sensation; common sensibles and the common sense organ; thought; active intelligence; practical philosophy; ethics; society; the theory of the state; music and literature.

Aristotle: Poetics, Ethics, Politics, and Categories

This file includes four books: Poetics, Ethics, Politics, and Categories. According to Wikipedia: "Aristotle (384 BC ? 322 BC)[1] was a Greek philosopher and polymath, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. His writings cover many subjects, including physics, metaphysics, poetry, theater, music, logic, rhetoric, linguistics, politics, government, ethics, biology, and zoology. Together with Plato and Socrates (Plato's teacher), Aristotle is one of the most important founding figures in Western philosophy. Aristotle's writings were the first to create a comprehensive system of Western philosophy, encompassing morality, aesthetics, logic, science, politics, and metaphysics."

Aristotle’s History of Animals. In Ten Books

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface.We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Avicenne

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Book of the Foundations

Essentially the sequel to The Life of St. Teresa, Teresa recounts the foundations of the Discalced Carmelite monasteries in Spain, both for men and women. This book tells of all the triumphs and troubles, and about the many people who helped her.(Introduction by Ann Boulais)

Change in the Village

A massive influx of wealth and the emergence of a new class of nouveau riche industrialists and tycoons began to change the social structure of Britain in the early twentieth century. George Sturt, a craftsman and writer, documents the transition in this insightful series of essays on the changes that began to transpire in his own small village during the period, upending hundreds of years of tradition in the process.