Showing 61–90 of 1580 results

Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight

LibriVox volunteers bring you 9 different recordings of Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight by Vachel Lindsay. This was the weekly poetry project for the week of February 18th, 2007.

Absalom and Achitophel

John Dryden published Absalom and Achitophel: A Poem in 1681. It is an elaborate historical allegory using the political situation faced by King David (2 Samuel 14-18) to mirror that faced by Charles II. Each monarch had a son whom a high-ranking minister attempted to use against him. James Scott, first Duke of Monmouth, Charles II's illegitimate son, was detected planning a rebellion late in 1681, supposedly instigated by the Earl of Shaftesbury, who was tried for high treason, and it is believed that Dryden wrote the poem in an effort to sway the jury in his trial. The fates of both Absalom (Monmouth) and Achitophel (Shaftesbury) are left unspecified at the end of the poem (Monmouth did rebel in 1685, after his father's death, and was executed, and Shaftesbury was acquitted), but we are left to surmise that their fates would resemble those of their Biblical counterparts: Absalom was killed against David's instructions and Achitophel hanged himself. The poem can be enjoyed without any special knowledge of either the Bible or seventeenth-century English history, but it is useful to understand why Monmouth (AKA Absalom) was such a useful tool to use against his father: Charles had many illegitimate offspring, but his wife was barren, so at his death the crown would pass (did pass) to his brother, James, who was Catholic, but Monmouth was Protestant as well as well-beloved by both the king and the people. England had good reason to dread a return of officially enforced Catholicism. The narrator's urbane attitude toward David's amatory adventures in the opening of the poem and his burlesque of the supposed Jebusitical plot (the "Popish Plot" of 1678) establish clearly his Tory bias in favor of the Establishment and his disdain of the panic caused by fear of Catholicism (Dryden himself converted to the Catholic faith at some time before 1685).

Adam and Eve

LibriVox volunteers bring you 15 recordings of Adam and Eve (From ?Paradise Lost,? Fourth Book) by John Milton. This was the Weekly Poetry project for Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton. It was originally published in 1667 (though written nearly ten years earlier) in ten books, with a total of over ten thousand individual lines of verse. A second edition followed in 1674, redivided into twelve books (in the manner of the division of Virgil's Aeneid) with minor revisions throughout and a note on the versification; most of the poem was written while Milton was blind, and was transcribed for him. Milton first presents Adam and Eve in Book IV with impartiality. The relationship between Adam and Eve is one of "mutual dependence, not a relation of domination or hierarchy." While the author does place Adam above Eve in regard to his intellectual knowledge, and in turn his relation to God, he also grants Eve the benefit of knowledge through experience. ( Summary from Wikipedia)

Adlestrop

LibriVox volunteers bring you 7 recordings of Adlestrop by Edward Thomas. This was the Weekly Poetry project for September 20th, 2009.

Advent Days and Poems of Remembrance

This is a very short volume of poems by Canadian poet Kate Seymour MacLean, containing only twenty poems. - Summary by Carolin

Advice: A Book of Poems

"Advice: A Book of Poems" by Maxwell Bodenheim. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven

LibriVox volunteers bring you nine different recordings of Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven, by William Butler Yeats. This was the weekly poetry project for the week of December 10th, 2006.

After Long Grief

LibriVox volunteers bring you 20 recordings of After Long Grief by Madison Cawein. This was the Weekly Poetry project for July 22, 2012. Madison Cawein was a poet from Louisville, Kentucky. His father made patent medicines from herbs. Cawein thus became acquainted with and developed a love for local nature as a child. His output was thirty-six books and 1,500 poems. His writing presented Kentucky scenes in a language echoing Percy Bysshe Shelley and John Keats. He soon earned the nickname the "Keats of Kentucky". (Summary from Wikipedia)

After Music

LibriVox volunteers bring you 17 recordings of After Music by Josephine Preston Peabody. This was the Weekly Poetry project for April 10, 2011. Josephine Preston Peabody was an American poet and dramatist. She was born in New York and educated at the Girls' Latin School, Boston, and at Radcliffe College. (summary from Wikipedia) After Music is taken from An American Anthology, 1787?1900, edited by Edmund Clarence Stedman (1833?1908)

Afternoon

This is a volume of poetry by Belgian poet ?mile Verhaeren, skillfully rendered into English verse by Charles Murphy. Although the English translation was published during World War I, the French original was published in 1905, and the topic of the poems is Verhaeren's love for his wife Marthe. - Summary by Carolin

Afternoon Songs

This is a volume of poems by Julia Caroline Dorr, part 5 of her collected poems. - Summary by Carolin

Against Indifference

LibriVox volunteers bring you 17 different recordings of Against Indifference by Charles Webbe. This was the weekly poetry project for the week of January 20th, 2008.

Against This Age

"Against This Age" by Maxwell Bodenheim. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

AIDS to Reflection and Confessions of an Inquiring Spirit

READER!-You have been bred in a land abounding with men, able in arts, learning, and knowledges manifold... But there is one art, of which every man should be master, the art of REFLECTION. If you are not a thinking man, to what purpose are you a man at all?-from "The Author's Preface"Here in one compact volume are two important works on religion and spirituality from one the finest poets in the English language. In Aids to Reflection, first published in 1825, and Confessions of an Inquiring Spirit, which appeared in 1840, Coleridge ponders: pain and pleasure, aka "sensibility" prudential aphorisms elements of religious philosophy original sin redemption the divine origin of the Bible and much more.With the included essay on faith and Coleridge's notes on The Book of Common Prayer, this is a concise guide to the philosophical thinking of one of the great names in English literature.English poet and philosopher SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE (1772-1834) is considered one of the great writers of Romanticism, the late 18th century artistic and intellectual movement. His best known works are The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan.

Akra the Slave

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Alf the Freebooter, Little Danneved and Swayne Trost, and Other Ballads

"Alf the Freebooter, Little Danneved and Swayne Trost, and Other Ballads" by Various (translated by George Borrow). Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten?or yet undiscovered gems?of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.